2016 election

  Most people assume that next year is the year when the presidential campaign and the U.S. Senate race suck all of the air out of the room in Ohio.

You won’t hear about anything else, especially in Hamilton County, which will end up being one of the most sought-after prizes in the Buckeye State by the presidential campaigns, and by both U.S. Senate candidates.

But they won’t suck quite all of the air out of the room in Hamilton County.

There was an air of breathless urgency in the e-mail from the Ted Strickland for Senate campaign that crashed into thousands of Ohio Democrats’ inboxes Thursday afternoon.

“If there was ever a time to show your support for Ted, that time is NOW.,’’ said the e-mail, signed by Strickland campaign manager Rebecca Pearcy.

“Polls have Ted in a dead heat with Rob Portman…Pundits are calling Ted’s campaign one of the most important races in the country to winning back the Senate majority…EVERYONE is watching to see just how much grassroots support we have.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati Parks wants to ask voters in November for a 1 mill tax levy to fund capital improvements and operating costs.

If the election were held today, former Ohio governor Ted Strickland would defeat Republican incumbent Rob Portman in in the U.S. Senate race, according to an independent poll released Monday morning.

The Quinnipiac University poll – which looked at Senate races in Ohio, Florida and Pennsylvania – had the former Democratic governor with 46 percent support to 40 percent for Portman, the Terrace Park Republican who is running for a second term.

The presidential candidate who isn’t a presidential candidate but will probably soon be a presidential candidate spent part of the past week in New Hampshire, the place where presidential candidacies go to either be born or die on the vine.

We’re talking John Kasich, the 69th governor of Ohio here.

The governor of a key swing state who has been racing around from one early primary or caucus state for months now, dropping big hints about wanting to be president, but always stopping short of announcing his candidacy.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the divisions among Kentucky Republicans; and how gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin can mend fences for the fall campaign. 

Here’s something we never expected to say a year ago, after Louisville businessman Matt Bevin - then the ultimate political party outsider - lost a tea party-fueled challenge to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in Kentucky’s GOP Senate primary:

Matt Bevin is now the Kentucky Republican Party’s candidate for governor in the November election.

Sarah Ramsey

Saying he wants to give Ohio Democrats "a competition, not a coronation," Cincinnati city council member P.G. Sittenfeld said in Columbus this morning he will stay in the U.S. Senate race, despite pressure within his own party to withdraw.

 

 Republicans Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio and Rand Paul have officially declared their run for the presidency, as has Democrat Hillary Clinton. But the field could get a lot more crowded in coming months, with ten other Republicans looking and talking like probable candidates, along with a handful of Democrats.

Still we wait. Like Vladimir and Estragon in Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot,” waiting for the Kasich presidential candidacy to arrive.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich has done everything a presidential candidate should do, except for one – announce his candidacy.

He’s showed up in early primary and caucus states, like South Carolina and New Hampshire.

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