Cincinnati Edition

Monday – Friday at 1:00 pm

Cincinnati Edition covers topics from regional government to business, education, health, technology and the arts.

You can join the discussion with decision-makers, authors, and voices from around the region and beyond by calling 513 419-7100, emailing talk@wvxu.org, and messaging through Facebook and Twitter.

Support for Cincinnati Edition comes from  The Johnson Foundation and The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile Jr. / US Bank Foundation.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Angelina Jolie made the difficult choice of having her breasts, ovaries and fallopian tubes removed because genetic tests showed, without the elective surgery, she had an 87 percent chance of getting breast cancer and a 50 percent chance of developing ovarian cancer.

Jolie's mother died at 56 years old. She also lost her grandmother and aunt to cancer. In a New York Times op-ed the filmmaker and actress explained why she made that decision.

Last month Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black appointed Thomas B. Corey as the city’'s Economic Inclusion Executive Project Director. Mr. Corey will oversee the city’'s newly-formed Department of Economic Inclusion. Harry Black and Thomas Corey join us to discuss the city'’s redefined efforts to improve the local economy by boosting opportunities for minority and women-owned businesses.

The 2015 session of the Kentucky General Assembly wrapped up Tuesday night in a burst of last-minute activity that resulted in the passage of several bills, including legislation to address the state’'s heroin problem. Joining us to review that bill and other key legislation passed in this session of the General Assembly are State Representative Dennis Keene; Rae Hodge, editor of The Oldham Era newspaper; and James Pilcher, Northern Kentucky reporter for The Cincinnati Enquirer.

Provided / City of Cincinnati

  Cincinnati firefighter Daryl Gordon has died of  injuries suffered in battling an early morning fire at a Madisonville apartment complex, according to Mayor John Cranley’s spokesman.

The 54-year-old firefighter reportedly fell down an elevator shaft while battling the four alarm blaze. WVXU reporter Bill Rinehart joins us for details and an update on the story. 

 

  Personal emails from Hillary, a public letter from Senate Republicans, speeches by possible candidates who may or may not be running for president, and Instagram photos posted by a House member, politicians are doing a lot of communicating lately. But what they are trying to say is often a mystery. 

  Former Ohio Governor and six-term US Congressman Ted Strickland and P.G. Sittenfeld, now serving his second term on Cincinnati’'s City Council, are in the Democratic primary race to decide who will challenge Republican Senator Rob Portman in the November 2016 general election. WVXU political reporter Howard Wilkinson interviewed each candidate, and joins us as we listen to what they had to say about key issues in the race.

  On March 30, CET, KET and other PBS stations will begin airing a new 6-hour Ken Burns production, Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies. The documentary, based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning book The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer by Siddhartha Mukherjee, takes a detailed look at one of our most dreaded diseases. Joining us for a preview of the film and to discuss what we know, and don'’t know, about cancer, are physicians with the University of Cincinnati Cancer Institute, Dr. Rebecca Cornelius, Dr. John Morris, and Dr. Thomas Herzog.

  This weekend, the Cincinnati Pops is joins forces with Cirque Mechanics to create amazing performances that combine popular classics with spectacular acrobatics. Here to give us an idea of what’'s in store for Music Hall audiences, and what goes into melding the music and the mechanics into each performance, are Sam Strater, Cincinnati Pops director of artistic administration; and Chris Lashua, founder and artistic director of Cirque Mechanics.

Performances are March 27, 28 and 29, for more details and ticket information click here.

  The feature film Dusk is making its world premiere this Wednesday at the Cleveland International Film Festival. The psychological thriller tells the story of a man who wakes up to find himself in the midst of a real-life nightmare. The film was shot entirely here in Cincinnati and in Owenton, Kentucky. Joining us to talk about the movie and what went into its production are Dusk creators and producers Ryan Lewis and Michael Maney. They are also the founders of Dog Day Films, LLC, an independent film company in Cincinnati.

  Since its premiere, the film documentary Hate Crimes in the Heartland has been used to spark awareness of and discussions about diversity, inclusion and justice, issues communities across the country are grappling with. Joining us to explore the film’'s messages and to discuss relations within and injustices faced by the Jewish and Arab communities are Hate Crimes in the Heartland’'s creator, filmmaker Rachel Lyon, and Shakila Ahmad, president of the Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati.

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