Cincinnati Edition

Monday – Friday at 1:00 pm

Cincinnati Edition covers topics from regional government to business, education, health, technology and the arts.

You can join the discussion with decision-makers, authors, and voices from around the region and beyond by calling 513 419-7100, emailing talk@wvxu.org, and messaging through Facebook and Twitter.

Support for Cincinnati Edition comes from  The Johnson Foundation and The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile Jr. / US Bank Foundation.

How To Manage Stress

Apr 7, 2016
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We all experience stress from time to time, whether in the workplace or at home, but how much is too much? Stress can have a negative impact on our minds and bodies; too much of it can cause diseases such as depression, anxiety and heart attack. According to the American Psychological Association, one in three Americans report experiencing extreme stress.
 

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  The National Cooperative Business Association has identified about 29,000 co-ops in the United States, employing more than 2 million people and generating more than $650 billion in revenue each year. Co-ops offer a wide range of goods and services, including childcare, healthcare, food and housing. Advocates point to them as a way to change the economic landscape of struggling communities.
 

Here  to discuss the potential of cooperatives, how the co-op movement is growing in Cincinnati and an upcoming conference at Xavier University on the cooperative economy are Director of Interfaith Business Builders Tim Kraus; founding member and President of Cincinnati Union Cooperative Initiative, Kristen Barker; and Professor of Community Justice and Social Economic Development in the Department of Africana Studies at John Jay College, City University of New York, Jessica Gordon Nembhard.

Xavier University will host The Cooperative Economy:  Building A Sustainable Future,  April 21-22 at the Cintas Center.  Click here for more information.

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  Mosquitos can be a pesky problem, but they can sometimes be more than a nuisance. They can also carry and transmit diseases to humans. One mosquito-borne virus in particular has been in recent news: the Zika virus. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there have been 312 cases in the United States, one in Kentucky and nine in Ohio, with one being in Butler County. The virus can lead to the birth defect microcephaly in children born to pregnant women who are infected.
 

Here to discuss the Zika virus and how to protect yourself from getting infected are Medical Director of the Ohio Department of Health, Dr. Mary DiOrio; Northern Kentucky Health Department Epidemiology Manager, Joyce Rice; and Director of Environmental Health and Safety at the Northern Kentucky Health Department, Steve Divine.

For more information about symptoms, diagnosis and treatment, click here.

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More than half of Cincinnati’s youth are living in poverty. Many may not feel like they have a voice. Louder than a Bomb, the world’s largest youth poetry slam, gives them a chance to speak out. Originating in Chicago in 2001, this contest is meant to unite young people, enabling them to hear one another’s stories and share experiences through spoken word. The finals for the local contest will take place April 9 in the Corbett Theater at the School for Creative and Performing Arts.
 

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The current presidential campaign is the most unusual in recent memory, with unconventional candidates and campaigns that continue to confound political pundits. And the way candidates are using social media has been a major reason political experts can't seem to get a handle on this election.

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During her time as New York City's Transportation Commissioner, Janette Sadik-Khan transformed that city's streets into dynamic spaces that are safe for pedestrians and bikers.

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Reds player William Hoy lost his hearing at age three due to meningitis. He not only grew up to be one of the greatest and most beloved baseball players of his time, he changed the way the game was played forever.

Dallas Morning News Theater Critic Nancy Churnin recently published a children's book about the Reds hall of famer: The William Hoy Story: How a Deaf Baseball Player Changed the Game. WVXU's Howard Wilkinson talked with her about the life and career of William "Dummy" Hoy. 

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Baseball umpires are still in business, despite a small effort to computerize them. 

The  so-called "Robo Ump"  made an appearance at a California independent baseball league July 28 and 29, 2015.  The system of three cameras placed strategically on the field and microcomputers in a nearby van is made by Sportvision.

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Have you filed your tax return yet?  If you haven't, you're not alone. The IRS says about one-third of Americans wait until the last minute to file their federal taxes. And, if you're counting it down, you've only got about two weeks left until the filing deadline, unless you get an extension.

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Activities such as art walks for the visually impaired, porch caroling and community park parties make a neighborhood more vibrant. These projects and more have been made possible by Nano Grants, small grants of $250 given out by The Center for Great Neighborhoods of Covington. They are available to residents, students and workers for creative ideas that bring people together.

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