Cincinnati Edition

Monday – Friday at 1:00 pm

Cincinnati Edition covers topics from regional government to business, education, health, technology and the arts.

You can join the discussion with decision-makers, authors, and voices from around the region and beyond by calling 513 419-7100, emailing, and messaging through Facebook and Twitter.

Support for Cincinnati Edition comes from  The Johnson Foundation and The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile Jr. / US Bank Foundation.

The application period for the $100,000 Haile Fellowships closes tomorrow, October 1. The Fellowships, awarded annually to two Greater Cincinnati-based innovators who have bold plans to address local challenges, are part of an ongoing effort by People’'s Liberty to find and foster individuals with creative ideas to better our community.

Provided, Melodic Connections

  The social skills most of us take for granted, making eye contact, having a conversation, cooperating with others, can prove a challenge for children with special needs. For six weeks this summer, local service and arts organizations collaborated to create a unique program to help special needs kids build social skills. 

  The Midwest Popular Culture Association and Midwest American Culture Association conference takes place in Cincinnati this week. The organizations promote and foster the scholarly study of our material culture, our popular music, movies, TV programs and comics. What can we learn from a closer examination of themes running through shows about zombies and vampires, or movies about superheroes? Quite a bit, it turns out. 

Provided, Camping and Education Foundation

  The second annual Great River Race on the Ohio takes place October 18. The event is designed to support outdoor programs for students that help them develop an appreciation for nature and our environment and learn how to achieve in life. 

Provided, History in Your Own Backyard

  From county courthouses to country stores, ghost towns to lost bridges, the Anderson Ferry to the Great Miami Railroad Bridge, Satolli Glassmeyer and his team are preserving the memories of the Tri-state through their project, History in Your Own Backyard. Their goal is to build a database of documentary videos featuring historic buildings, bridges, tunnels, and communities, throughout Kentucky, Ohio and Indiana. 

Mylah's Facebook page

Six-year-old Mylah Bryant has a blood disease (aplastic anemia) that required chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

Not only did doctors discuss making her well, they asked her parents if they wanted to preserve tissue so she could reproduce years later without the damaging effects of chemotherapy.

With two debates under their belts, the remaining Republican presidential contenders continue the fight, though The Donald and Dr. Ben Carson are still leading the polls. 

This spring, a new initiative was launched to connect bold ideas to improve Greater Cincinnati with people who have the potential to make significant investments. Transform Cincinnati set out in search of bold ideas, able to affect change for the better in our community. And on September 30th, the finalists who submitted the top six ideas will present them to a group of potential investors at the Transform Cincinnati Marketplace

The local infant mortality rate is still unacceptably high, but more babies are surviving to their first birthday in Cincinnati than in previous years. The Cincinnati Health Department is working to continue that trend, sponsoring a series of discussions for would-be, expectant and young mothers, and fathers, about family planning, healthy moms and babies. 

  On September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, formally notifying the Confederacy of his intention to free all slaves within the rebellious states if they did not cease fighting and rejoin the Union. On January 1, 1863, with the Confederate states still in rebellion, President Lincoln issued the Final Emancipation Proclamation.