Cincinnati Edition

Monday – Friday at 1:00 pm

Cincinnati Edition covers topics from regional government to business, education, health, technology and the arts.

You can join the discussion with decision-makers, authors, and voices from around the region and beyond by calling 513 419-7100, emailing talk@wvxu.org, and messaging through Facebook and Twitter.

Support for Cincinnati Edition comes from  The Johnson Foundation and The Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile Jr. / US Bank Foundation.

  Richard Green worked at The Cincinnati Enquirer for 16 years starting in 1988, before moving on to management positions with Gannett in Palm Springs and De Moines. And now he’s back. Earlier this month, Rick Green took over as president and publisher of The Enquirer. He joins us to discuss returning to the city'’s only remaining daily newspaper, and how The Enquirer is changing and evolving to compete in a 24-7 digital news environment.

  According to the Association for College Admission Counseling, the average U.S. school has one guidance counselor for every 500 students. In many poorer school districts, where arguably the need is much greater, the ratio is even worse. Northern Kentucky University recently hosted the annual National Evidence-Based School Counseling Conference, where experts explored the best methods and practices to positively impact student achievement.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Angelina Jolie made the difficult choice of having her breasts, ovaries and fallopian tubes removed because genetic tests showed, without the elective surgery, she had an 87 percent chance of getting breast cancer and a 50 percent chance of developing ovarian cancer.

Jolie's mother died at 56 years old. She also lost her grandmother and aunt to cancer. In a New York Times op-ed the filmmaker and actress explained why she made that decision.

Last month Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black appointed Thomas B. Corey as the city’'s Economic Inclusion Executive Project Director. Mr. Corey will oversee the city’'s newly-formed Department of Economic Inclusion. Harry Black and Thomas Corey join us to discuss the city'’s redefined efforts to improve the local economy by boosting opportunities for minority and women-owned businesses.

The 2015 session of the Kentucky General Assembly wrapped up Tuesday night in a burst of last-minute activity that resulted in the passage of several bills, including legislation to address the state’'s heroin problem. Joining us to review that bill and other key legislation passed in this session of the General Assembly are State Representative Dennis Keene; Rae Hodge, editor of The Oldham Era newspaper; and James Pilcher, Northern Kentucky reporter for The Cincinnati Enquirer.

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