Cincinnati Edition

Monday – Friday at 1:00 pm
  • Hosted by Dan Hurley

Cincinnati Edition covers topics from regional government to business, education, health, technology and the arts.

You can join the discussion with decision-makers, authors, and voices from around the region and beyond by calling 513 419-7100, emailing talk@wvxu.org, and messaging through Facebook and Twitter.

Support for Cincinnati Edition comes from The Johnson Foundation, Dick Rosenthal, and The Maxwell C. Weaver Foundation, U.S. Bank Trustee.

cincinnati edition
Jim Nolan / WVXU

After a federal judge blocks work requirements for Medicaid patients in Kentucky, Governor Matt Bevin cuts dental and vision coverage for about 460,000 low-income Kentuckians on Medicaid. Another judge denies Bevin's request to amend a court ruling on the state's pension plan. And Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear announces he will run for governor in 2019.

The City of Cincinnati and downtown organizations propose a plan to reduce panhandling. And the Cincinnati Reds today look nothing like the team that took the field last April. What's going on?

Groups Bringing Solar Power To Schools In Uganda

Jul 12, 2018
all we are uganda
Courtesy All We Are

The non-profit organization All We Are has a mission to solarize more than 50 schools in Uganda by the year 2025. The organization has worked in the country for the last eight years and is supported in its efforts by Rotary Clubs here in the U.S. and in Uganda.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

You might need to start carrying more than just a handful of spare change when you head out for a night on the town across Cincinnati.

NASA/The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA

Later this month the planet Mars will make its closest approach to Earth in 15 years, appearing large and bright enough to be easily seen with the naked eye.

girls with pearls
Courtesy / Girls with Pearls

Keeping girls in school, helping them dream big, and empowering them to plan for the future is the mission of Girls with Pearls, a local afterschool program for girls. Founded in 2016 at Rockdale Academy Elementary School in Avondale, Girls with Pearls fosters leadership to change the outcome for girls as they grow into young women through education, personal responsibility, and social awareness.

Courtesy / Center for Independent Living Options

Young people with disabilities, whether physical or cognitive, need extra help getting ready to transition from a school environment, where things are carefully ordered, to the world of work and independent living.

Pixabay

As society loosens its restrictions on gender roles, it seems the stigma around women drinking alcohol has vanished. According to the National Institutes of Health, drinking habits among women and men are becoming more alike, which could be putting women at greater risk for a variety of alcohol-related dangers. One of the key risk factors is addiction, but another health concern is the link between drinking and the risk for breast cancer.

cincinnati edition
JESSICA LUCIA FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/THELOUSHE / CREATIVE COMMONS

As you were outside waiting for the big Fourth of July fireworks to start, you may have been lucky enough to enjoy nature's light show, put on by fireflies, or lightning bugs as they are known in our region, looking for mates.

cincinnati edition
CITY OF HAMILTON

For more than a century Hamilton, Ohio was a major manufacturing city. Paper mills, safe companies, automobile parts manufacturers fueled the small city along the Great Miami River. Beginning in the 1960s those factories began closing, transforming it into the classic Midwestern Rust Belt city.

Jim Nolan/WVXU

A recent poll shows Republican Mike DeWine leading Democrat Richard Cordray by four points in the Ohio governor's race. But things don't look as good for the GOP in Ohio's U.S. Senate contest. The multi-million dollar scandal involving the charter school Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, or ECOT, could play a major role in the November elections. And covering the Trump White House as the president continues to label the press as the enemy.

Organizations Offer Support To Abuse Victims

Jul 5, 2018
Health.mil

The Bureau of Justice Statistics' recent National Crime Victimization Survey estimates that people in the U.S. experienced more than 320,000 incidents of rape and sexual assault in 2016. The majority of incidents of abuse are reported by women, but men are also victims, and research suggests men face an even greater stigma in reporting sexual assault than women.

hippy program
HIPPY / Provided

Based on one kindergarten readiness screening, half of Kentucky's children are not prepared for kindergarten. Research by Brigance, an educational assessment company, shows that children who enter the grade without the appropriate language, cognitive, motor and social/emotional skills have trouble catching up with their peers.

Mental health during pregnancy
Pixabay.com

Many mothers who experience postpartum depression and anxiety now seek professional help. But when it comes to their mental health during preconception and pregnancy, some women suffer in silence.

How Yeast (Yes, Yeast) Shaped Civilization

Jul 2, 2018
yeast book
Oxford Press / Provided

Research shows the ancient Egyptians were using yeast to produce alcoholic beverages and leaven bread over 5,000 years ago. But it wasn't until the invention of the microscope followed by the work of Louis Pasteur in the late 1860s that yeast was identified as a living organism.

fair housing
Housing Opportunities Made Equal / Provided

President Lynden Johnson signed the Fair Housing Act into law in April 1968, the same month the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated. The bill was a major step forward in the Civil Rights Movement, created with the belief that every person has the right to rent or purchase a home. The law prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, disability, family status or national origin.

But as we mark the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act, housing discrimination still exists in the United States.

cincinnati edition
Jim Nolan / WVXU

Cincinnati City Council approves the city's $407 million operating budget for the new fiscal year that starts Sunday. Councilwoman Amy Murray shares what she learned at a national emergency communications conference as two firms continue their reviews of Cincinnati's 911 system following the tragic death of Kyle Plush. Mayor Cranley vetoes a proposed streetcar congestion fix. City officials narrow the possible sites for the police department's new District Five headquarters. And it's a turbulent time for some of the major companies headquartered in Cincinnati.   

Top Takeaways From Tuesday's Primary

Jun 28, 2018
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez
Seth Wenig / AP

Tuesday's primary results shake things up, as progressive liberals in the Democratic Party show their strength; candidates endorsed by President Donald Trump come out ahead; and former presidential candidate Mitt Romney easily wins the GOP nomination for the Senate in Utah.    

Modern Day Workers Get Their Mural

Jun 27, 2018
Weston Art Gallery

Two new exhibits at the Weston Art Gallery in the Aronoff Center for the Arts pay tribute to the monumental "Worker Murals" of Cincinnati's Union Terminal. The artist, Winold Reiss, visited Cincinnati factories and photographed real workers for his mosaics in the 1930s. Now, artists Matt Lynch and Curtis Goldstein visit modern day factories and depict women and men at work for their series of mosaics inspired by Winold Reiss.

Selena Reder/WVXU

On May 19 a yellow house on Grace Avenue in Mt. Lookout met the wrecking ball. The home stood for more than one hundred years. Some neighbors called it historic. But the new owner said that historic character had long since been stripped away. Now the site of this demolition, and others in Mt. Lookout and Hyde Park, have ignited a debate over the lot-splitting and sub-dividing of homes in these increasingly desirable neighborhoods.

How To Rid Your Garden Of Pests

Jun 26, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

The hot, humid days and heavy rains we’ve had this month have been great for area gardens, but the weather has also been good for the pests that can eat or damage your plants. Uncontrolled, aphids, beetles, spider mites and other insects can wipe out all of the work you put into your garden.

Meet The Woman Behind Cincinnati's Tourism Boom

Jun 25, 2018
julie calvert
Courtesy Julie Calvert

Tourism is a rapidly expanding market, and at the forefront of the industry is the Cincinnati USA Convention & Visitors Bureau. According to a recent report the organization published, in 2016, more than 26 million people visited the Cincinnati region, spending $5 billion collectively, driven by spending on food and beverage, retail and lodging. Tourism generates $1.1 billion in tax revenue, including state and local taxes, and more than 77,000 jobs are sustained through the industry.

Net Zero Camping: Going Green at Camp Joy

Jun 25, 2018
Provided

Camp Joy in Clarksville, Ohio has had a strong mission of inclusion since desegregating in the 1940s. The camp also provides a number of programs for families who couldn't otherwise afford a summer camp. Now the mission is growing with a new commitment to the environment.

Jim Nolan/WVXU

Attorney Al Gerhardstein calls the lawsuit against an African-American police lieutenant by two white officers "the most outrageous lawsuit I have ever seen." Hamilton County commissioners raise the sales tax. Now a petition effort is underway to force the measure to a vote. A controversial "Stand Your Ground" bill is expected to go to a vote next week.

One Local Woman's Journey To Justice

Jun 21, 2018
OJPC

Tyra Patterson was convicted in the 1994 murder of 15-year-old Michelle Lai, even though she did not pull the trigger. The Ohio Justice and Policy Center typically does not pursue cases of wrongful convictions but they took on Patterson's case. On December 25, 2017, she was released from prison after serving 23 years for a crime she did not commit.

Burnet Woods
KEITH LANSER / Wikimedia Commons

A group of campers and artists want to make neighbors with the wildlife in one of Cincinnati's oldest parks. Two proposals would change part of the 90-acres inside Clifton's Burnet Woods.

How To Get Your Teen To Put Down Their Smartphone

Jun 20, 2018
cincinnati edition
Pixabay.com

Medical researchers, educators and tech professionals continue their warnings about children and teens spending too much time on their smartphones.   

cincinnati edition
Amazon.com

Alexander Graham Bell invented not only the telephone, but also early versions of the phonograph, the metal detector, airplanes, and hydrofoil boats. Bell was also a pioneering speech teacher and a champion of educating those with hearing impairments.   

cincinnati edition
Wikimedia Commons

A high school diploma is a necessary step in a young person's journey to a more secure future. But recent studies show postsecondary education has become increasingly essential, whether that education comes from a two-year or four-year degree, trade school, or a career and technical certificate program.   

The Toys That Made Us Creator Talks Season Two

Jun 19, 2018
Bill Rhinehart/WVXU

The Netflix series The Toys That Made Us returned with a second season on May 25 after a successful first season featuring some of history's most iconic toy franchises. From the breakout success of Cincinnati-based Kenner Toys' "Star Wars" line, the split-second decisions that launched "He-Man" and the beleaguered path of the "Star Trek" franchise, "The Toys That Made Us" examines the ups, downs and unexpected twists of one of childhood's most beloved pastimes.

cincinnati edition
DriveOhio/Ohio.gov

In January, Governor John Kasich signed an executive order establishing DriveOhio as a one-stop shop for researchers, developers and manufacturers to collaborate on autonomous and connected vehicle initiatives in Ohio. This May, Gov. Kasich signed an executive order to authorize autonomous vehicle testing in the state.   

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