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Years ago, in the small town of Maiden, N.C., a man named Shannon Whisnant bought a storage locker, and in it he found a grill. When he took both of them home and opened the grill, he discovered something he hadn't been expecting: a mummified human leg.

Most people — one presumes — would've have wanted to get rid of the leg as soon as possible. Whisnant, however, wanted to keep it. Trouble is, the original owner of the limb, John Wood, wanted it back. He'd had to have that leg amputated years earlier.

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The streets of Philadelphia are lined with people hoping to get a glimpse of Pope Francis. The pope is finishing his U.S. tour this weekend. At this hour, the pope is addressing the crowds gathered at Benjamin Franklin Parkway for the Festival of Families.

Editor's note on Oct. 28: Because of safety concerns, Khaled's last name has been removed from this page.

Khaled is one of the few Syrians to have made it to the U.S. since the start of the Syrian civil war. Even here, though, the 31-year-old remains in limbo, unsure of how long he'll be allowed to stay.

For now, Khaled lives in Southern California. When he spoke with NPR's Arun Rath, Khaled spoke of his life in Syria before the war.

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Breaking bricks. That's what 50-year-old Mohammed Alfazuddin has done for about half of his life outside Dhaka, Bangladesh.

"We do it because we are poor and because we don't have any stones in Bangladesh, so we need to break up bricks to mix in with the concrete when we make buildings," he says.

For each brick he smashes, Alfazuddin makes the equivalent of about 3 cents. He's illiterate and lives with his family in a tin-shed home owned by his in-laws.

The Onondaga Nation, a Native American tribe in New York, is hosting the world indoor lacrosse championships. It's the first time an indigenous sovereign territory has hosted a major sports tournament — and it comes at a time when Iroquois brothers are the sport's rising stars.

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Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Pope Francis continues his American tour. He's just landed in New York to cheers and waving flags an a band playing "New York, New York."

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

He's been at it for 45 years. Wake up before 2 a.m. Turn on the fryer. And have the glazed doughnuts and peanut-topped coffeecakes ready by 6 a.m.

Yup, Michael Doucleff Sr. is a baker and small-business owner in Alton, Ill.

At at age 70, he doesn't show many signs of slowing down. He's still working more than 40 hours a week, still carrying 50-pound bags of flour upstairs from the basement.

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