Kara Cooney- The Woman Who Would Be King

Oct 24, 2014

Hatshepsut - the daughter of a general who usurped Egypt's throne and a mother with ties to the previous dynasty - successfully negotiated a path from the royal nursery to the very pinnacle of authority, and her reign saw one of Ancient Egypt’s most prolific building periods. Scholars have long speculated as to why her monuments were destroyed within a few decades of her death, all but erasing evidence of her unprecedented rule.

Constructing a rich narrative history using the artifacts that remain, noted Egyptologist Kara Cooney offers a remarkable interpretation of how Hatshepsut rapidly but methodically consolidated power - and why she fell from public favor just as quickly. The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt traces the unconventional life of an almost-forgotten pharaoh and explores our complicated reactions to women in power.