If You Resolved To Stop Smoking This Year, We Talk About Ways To Do It Successfully

Jan 4, 2016

A majority of smokers say they want to quit, yet just four to seven percent of smokers are able to quit on any given attempt.
Credit flickr.com

    

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of death and disease in the United States. Cigarette smoking kills more than 480,000 Americans each year.

Gallup surveys conducted over the last three decades show a consistent average: 75-percent of smokers say they want to quit. But success rates are extremely low. In 2014, an estimated 40 million U.S. adults were cigarette smokers.

Joining us to discuss why it is so difficult to kick the smoking habit and the programs and methods available to those who want to quit are University of Cincinnati James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy Clinical Professor and Director of the Win by Quitting smoking cessation clinic at the UC Barrett Cancer Center, Dr. Jane Pruemer; professor in the UC School of Social Work, College of Allied Health Sciences, Dr. Shauna Acquavita; and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Professor of Medicine, Comprehensive Lung Cancer Center Co-Director, and Director of Experimental Therapeutics, Dr. John Morris.

Information on programs and help to quit smoking:

Smoking Cessation Programs in Hamilton County

UC Health/UC Cancer Institute, 513-584-QUIT (584-7848)

Christ Hospital, 513-263-8699

St. Elizabeth Healthcare, 859-301-5570

Ohio Tobacco Quit Line: 1-800-QUIT-NOW (784-8669)

American Cancer Society