How Schools Can Address Teen Mental Health Issues

Mar 24, 2016

According to the National Alliance on Mental Health, one in five adolescents ages 13-18 have or will develop a serious mental illness such as depression.
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Academic and social pressures can make  junior high and high school a tough time for teenagers. And during those formative years, teens are also going through physical, mental and emotional changes. According to the National Alliance on Mental Health, one in five adolescents ages 13-18 have or will develop a serious mental illness such as depression.

Seventy percent of kids in state and local juvenile justice systems have some form of mental illness. While it is only part of the solution, a better mental health focus at schools could help prevent tragic incidents such as school shootings and suicides.

Here to discuss teen mental health and the role of school administration in recognizing potential problems and helping students are School Psychologist with Cincinnati Public Schools, Ron Miller; Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and the University of Cincinnati, Dr. Drew Barzman; and Children's Hospital and UC Professor of Pediatrics, Psychiatry and Biomedical Informatics, Dr. John Pestian.

If you are thinking about suicide or know anyone who may need help, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 1-800-273-TALK (8255), to speak with a counselor in your area, 24/7. 

JOURNEY to Successful Living and Talbert House have partnered to present #askmewhoiam: Conference on Youth Culture to promote better understanding of youth culture, specifically as it relates to young adults with serious mental health challenges. The conference takes place March 31 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m at the Kingsgate Marriott Conference Center.