Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

The fight over school funding in Ohio has gone on for nearly three decades. One former Ohio congressman and former state lawmaker says he is exploring the possibility of launching another lawsuit against the state for the way it funds for-profit charter schools. 

Students from around the state who are participating in the YMCA’s “Youth in Government” program went to the Ohio Statehouse today. Gov. John Kasich met with the group. Here's what he had to say.

April 20th is a day that is widely celebrated by those in favor of marijuana use and legalization. But on this day, hundreds of students from around Ohio took a different message to the Statehouse. 

A new report on air quality in Ohio has some good and bad news for the Buckeye State.

The leader of Democrats in the Ohio Senate is stepping down but he’ll be replaced with a familiar face. 

The state lawmaker who was discovered drunk in a Cincinnati area McDonalds with a weapon in March has escaped felony weapons charges. 

The Republican leaders of Ohio’s House and Senate and Republican Gov. John Kasich have come up with a way to deal with the $615-million-dollar revenue shortfall that’s expected by the end of this fiscal year. 

Gov. John Kasich held a ceremonial bill signing yesterday to celebrate a new law requiring coverage for medically necessary treatments for autistic children. 

Republican House leaders say they're rejecting a budget proposal to make changes to a program that helps pay medical bills for about 40,000 Ohio families with medically fragile children. And those families also got a boost from a well-known Ohio sports figure who knows what they’re dealing with.

The Class of 2018 in Ohio’s high schools will be the first to choose their route to graduation – pass some state tests, take a college entrance exam or earn an industry credential. But new numbers show as many as one-third of those students won’t be able to get their diplomas when those new graduation standards take effect next year. That has the state’s education leaders scrambling to make changes.

Lower than projected state tax revenue totals will make budgeting more difficult for Ohio’s lawmakers in the coming weeks. Advocates for the arts know the tight budget threatens their funding but it's not keeping them from making a case to save those dollars.

About two dozen Ohio Republicans who support President Trump's nomination of Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court took their message to the Statehouse earlier today.

Gov. John Kasich doubled down on his plan to require teachers who are renewing their licenses to spend days shadowing business leaders, despite the fact that legislative leaders are not embracing that plan. 

Gov. John Kasich’s speech was getting praise from his Republican colleagues in the legislature.

A new study paid for by financial planners, non-profits and state leaders shows most Ohioans are not saving enough for retirement. 

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