Howard Wilkinson

Political Reporter

Howard Wilkinson joined the WVXU News Team after 30 years of covering local and state politics for The Cincinnati Enquirer. A native of Dayton, Ohio, Wilkinson has covered every Ohio governor’s race since 1974 as well as 12 presidential nominating conventions. His streak continued by covering both the 2012 Republican and Democratic conventions for 91.7 WVXU. Along with politics, Wilkinson also covered the 2001 Cincinnati race riots; the Lucasville Prison riot in 1993; the Air Canada plane crash at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport in 1983; and the 1997 Ohio River flooding. The Cincinnati Reds are his passion. "I've been listening to WVXU and public radio for many years, and I couldn't be more pleased at the opportunity to be part of it,” he says.

In 2012, the Society of Professional Journalists inducted Wilkinson into the Cincinnati Journalism Hall of Fame. 

Wilkinson appears on  Cincinnati Edition, blogs on politics and more, and writes the weekly column Politically Speaking at wvxu.org.

Ways To Connect

Michael Keating

  WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about a poll showing good news for John Kasich in Ohio; and some less than encouraging numbers for Hillary Clinton in three key swing states.. 

  Yes, the Quinnipiac University Poll that came out this week – known in political circles as the Q-Poll – showed Ohio Gov. John Kasich leading Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton by seven percentage points in Ohio, a key battleground state.

Well, that’s interesting, but it was not the worst news for Clinton in the Q-Poll of three key swing states – Ohio, Pennsylvania and Florida.

Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio Gov. John Kasich would defeat Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton in Ohio if the election were held today, according to a new independent poll.

And Clinton runs dead even with Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul in the Buckeye State, according to the poll released Wednesday morning by the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute.

  WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik morning about the historic and unique role Ohio has played in choosing the nation's presidents. 

  Ha! We knew it all along!

Now we have the numbers to prove it! Real, live numbers – and, in politics, you’re best off not arguing with numbers.

At last we can prove what we knew intuitively all along – that there is no better state to look at than Ohio as the predictor of who the next president will be.  And it is the state where the vote in presidential elections most closely mirrors the nation’s vote as a whole.

Ohio is, in fact, the ultimate bellwether state.

Provided, Hamilton County Coroner

  Hamilton County commissioners met behind closed doors with the county coroner Wednesday morning to discuss acquiring property for a new crime lab, but apparently came no closer to choosing a site.

In February, commissioners abandoned a plan on using part of the old Mercy Mount Airy Hospital for the new crime lab. Coroner Lakshmi Sammarco says finding a new home for the crime lab is a must, because the old one is cramped and out-of-date.

Sammarco came out of this morning's (Wednesday's) meeting saying they were making progress.

  WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke Monday morning with news director Maryanne Zeleznik about Ohio Gov. John Kasich's presidential ambitions; and when he might formally enter the race. 

  

Most people know, or think they know, the story of Wilbur and Orville Wright, the two bicycle mechanics from Dayton, Ohio who taught the world to fly.

The presidential candidate who isn’t a presidential candidate but will probably soon be a presidential candidate spent part of the past week in New Hampshire, the place where presidential candidacies go to either be born or die on the vine.

We’re talking John Kasich, the 69th governor of Ohio here.

The governor of a key swing state who has been racing around from one early primary or caucus state for months now, dropping big hints about wanting to be president, but always stopping short of announcing his candidacy.

Provided / SORTA

Metro estimates it will cost $4 million to $4.7 million to operate Cincinnati's streetcar in its first year.

The estimates vary depending on whether the system is run by union SORTA (Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority) employees or a private contractor.

According to the SORTA report, the cheaper option of $4 million would be the private contractor.

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