Howard Wilkinson

Political Reporter

Howard Wilkinson joined the WVXU News Team after 30 years of covering local and state politics for The Cincinnati Enquirer. A native of Dayton, Ohio, Wilkinson has covered every Ohio governor’s race since 1974 as well as 12 presidential nominating conventions. His streak continued by covering both the 2012 Republican and Democratic conventions for 91.7 WVXU. Along with politics, Wilkinson also covered the 2001 Cincinnati race riots; the Lucasville Prison riot in 1993; the Air Canada plane crash at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport in 1983; and the 1997 Ohio River flooding. The Cincinnati Reds are his passion. "I've been listening to WVXU and public radio for many years, and I couldn't be more pleased at the opportunity to be part of it,” he says.

In 2012, the Society of Professional Journalists inducted Wilkinson into the Cincinnati Journalism Hall of Fame. 

Wilkinson appears on  Cincinnati Edition, blogs on politics and more, and writes the weekly column Politically Speaking at wvxu.org.

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The Ohio Supreme Court has ruled that Norwood voters won't be voting on a ballot issue in November which would decriminalize marijuana in the city.

Sensible Norwood, the group which circulated the petitions to put the issue on the Nov. 8 ballot, appealed to the Ohio Supreme Court after the Hamilton County Board of Elections rejected the ballot issue in August. 

There is a reason Ohio is called the bellwether of American presidential politics – a reason why it is watched so closely by the political professionals and the pundits every year.

Ohio is a microcosm of America, except in a few demographic categories, such as the percentage of Hispanic population – 17 percent nationwide, only 3.3 percent in Ohio.

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It's not very often that a political party rejects a candidate who won its primary election and backs a write-in candidate instead.

But that's exactly what the Hamilton, Clermont and Brown County  Democratic Parties are doing in Ohio's Second Congressional District race.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

A Cincinnati City Council motion to create a heroin "quick response" team is likely to be passed at Wednesday's council meeting.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the 2017 Cincinnati city elections - with three open council seats and the mayor, John Cranley, up for re-election. What's at stake for Cranley in this council race, should he win a second term? 

Let's all take a breather from Clinton-Trump, Portman-Strickland, et al, for a moment and think about the year 2017.

Specifically, let's think for a moment about the Cincinnati City Council race, where, for the second time since the city charter was changed, nine council members will be elected to four year  terms.

And let's think about the fact that one-third of those seats on city council will be  wide open; and what that might mean for Mayor John Cranley – assuming (and, really, it is way too early to be assuming anything) he is re-elected.

Howard Wilkinson

Cincinnati Council member Kevin Flynn said Wednesday that he won't run for a second term on city council next year, but Thursday, he left the door open just a bit to a possible return in the future.

Howard Wilkinson

Bill Clinton, the 42nd president of the United States, told thousands of union workers at Coney Island Monday that this is a strange election, but one where they must work to make his wife, Hillary Clinton, the 45th president.

"She never got anything done in Washington- as First Lady, as senator, as Secretary of State – without the strong support from Democrats and Republicans,'' Clinton told the crowd at the annual Cincinnati AFL-CIO Labor Council picnic.

There are those who are ready to stick a fork in the U.S. Senate campaign of former Ohio governor Ted Strickland and declare him done.

Strickland, of course, is not among them.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump stood before several thousand American Legion members at Duke Energy Convention Center Thursday morning and promised that he, as president, would reform the VA medical system.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, in a room full of thousands of men and women who have served in the nation's military, said her opponent wants to destroy the alliances "that generations of Americans in uniform have fought and died to create those bonds."

Ann Thompson

A nationally appointed committee is close to taking testimony in whistleblower cases at Cincinnati VA Medical Center. Acting Director Glenn Costie, during an interview with reporters at the American Legion Convention Wednesday, said Dr. Gene Goldman will lead the board made up of three to four people.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about Ohio Gov. John Kasich's absolute refusal to endorse Donald Trump; and how Kasich may be looking to be there to pick up the pieces and put the party back together again  if the GOP is shattered in a Trump loss. 

As much as he would have liked it to be, Ohio Gov. John Kasich's name will not be on the presidential ballot this year.

The name of Donald Trump, of course, will be on that ballot – a name that John Kasich is loath to even speak out loud, much less endorse.

The governor of the Buckeye State is left to wonder what might have been.

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The Hamilton County Board of Elections Monday unanimously rejected a Norwood ballot issue which would decriminalize marijuana in the city.

Attorney Brice Keller, who represents Sensible Norwood, the group which circulated petitions for the ballot issue, said he is likely to ask the Ohio Supreme Court to review the elections board's decision.

Keller said Monday afternoon he is likely to file something with the Ohio Supreme Court this week to get an expedited hearing on the matter. 

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