Andy Chow

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission’s Fellowship program as a production assistant for “The Ohio Channel.”

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

The day after the election brought a swarm of media coverage of all things Donald Trump. But another story was playing out in northeast Ohio, where the Republican nominee for an Ohio House seat outed herself to actually be a Democrat. Cassandra McDonald discusses what drove her to that decision and what she takes away from this year’s race.

Ohio is outpacing most of the country in its work to bringing down the number of people who are homeless in the state. But those working with homeless Ohioans say there’s more work to do. 

The House and Senate are working on bills that could essentially continue a freeze on the state’s renewable energy requirements, something Gov. John Kasich says he’s against. But there are lawmakers who say soon, the threat of the governor's veto will not be as powerful as it used to be. 

The state’s top leaders are squaring off on a bill to change Ohio’s green energy policies, and the clock is ticking – a two year freeze on the state’s renewable energy standards for electric utilities expires in a few weeks. 

One of Ohio’s largest energy companies could be closing or selling all of its power plants within the next two years. 

The state and its largest online charter school are locked in a dispute over how to prove it’s providing an education to its more than 15,000 students. That fight is not just playing out in court but through TV, radio and web ads featuring a student defense.

The state’s education department won a major battle over the attendance fight with ECOT, Ohio’s largest online charter school. 

Ohio’s largest online charter school is firing back against state officials who say they don’t have enough information to perform an attendance audit. The Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, or ECOT, says it won’t hand over student log-in times unless a judge tells them to. 

Advocates say time is running out for lawmakers to overhaul the way congressional districts are drawn in Ohio.  

With the presidential race heating up and Cleveland preparing to host the Republican National Convention, one educational institute is conducting a project in hopes of shedding partisan barriers. They want to do this through the power of music.

While people are still reeling in the aftermath of the mass shooting in Orlando, leaders in Ohio say it’s time to add more protections for the LGBT community. 

In responding to the tragic mass shooting in Orlando, Republican U.S. Senator Rob Portman wanted to make it clear where he stood on selling guns to suspected terrorists. But as Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, his explanation seemed to cause even more confusion.

The use of high-tech, expensive body cameras has become a big topic in the world of law enforcement. But one state lawmaker thinks there’s a way to utilize a tool to increase accountability that’s already within everyone’s reach. 

The Ohio House and Senate took on a jam-packed slate of bills for their last day of lawmaking before leaving for summer break. 

Five public universities are opening up their checkbooks for all of Ohio to see. 

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