The Torch
10:03 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Let's Catch Up: Taekwondo Setback, And A Spice Girls Sighting

Great Britain's Stuart Bithell leaps off the boat while teammate Luke Patience sails on as they win silver in the men's sailing 470 two-person dinghy medal race in Weymouth, England.
William West AFP/Getty Images

Good morning. The final weekend of the Summer Olympics is about to begin. In the medal count, the U.S. has jumped out to a 90-80 lead over China, with 39 golds to China's 37. And Russia has overtaken Great Britain, with 57 to the host nation's 54 medals.

Here's today's news that caught our interest:

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The Two-Way
9:53 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Drought Deepens In Hardest Hit Parts Of U.S.

Drought-stricken corn struggles to survive on a farm near Poseyville, Ind.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 11:36 am

The areas of the lower 48 states where this summer's drought is judged to be "severe, extreme or exceptional" (in ascending order of seriousness) increased slightly again this week, according to the experts at the federal government's National Drought Mitigation Center.

It reports that:

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Shots - Health Blog
9:26 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Yes, There's Probably A Medical App For That

With thousands of medical apps available for download, patients and physicians can instantly keep visual records of wounds and look up symptoms.
Benjamin Morris NPR

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 9:46 am

How many calories have I consumed this week? How well did I sleep last night?

What about this thing on my leg — is it infected? What does an ECG for ventricular tachycardia look like again?

Yes, you guessed it. There is an app for that.

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The Two-Way
8:47 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Fighting Has Forced More Than 1.5 Million Syrians To Move, U.N. Says

In northwestern Syria earlier this year, this man and boys fled fighting.
Bulent Kilic AFP/Getty Images

The scope of the ongoing crisis in Syria is made clear yet again by two new reports from the United Nations:

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The Two-Way
8:00 am
Fri August 10, 2012

In Wisconsin, Thousands To Pay Homage To Sikh Temple Shooting Victims

A makeshift memorial outside the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in honor of the six people who were killed there.
Mira Oberman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 12:03 pm

Several thousand people from across the U.S. and the world are expected in Oak Creek, Wis., today as Sikhs gather to mourn for the six people killed during Sunday's shooting rampage at a temple.

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Participation Nation
7:33 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Doing The Write Thing In Portland, Maine

Practicing the craft of storytelling in the Telling Room.
Courtesy of the Telling Room

Originally published on Tue August 14, 2012 12:59 pm

The Telling Room is a non-profit center in Portland that inspires young people to explore the pleasures of the written word.

In an increasingly diverse state, the Telling Room engages with communities that are under-served by the public school system: young people from Maine's growing immigrant and refugee populations, those with emotional challenges and at-risk middle and high school students.

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The Two-Way
7:18 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Three U.S. Troops Killed In Latest 'Green On Blue' Attack

As boys washed their feet in the background, a U.S. Marine stood nearby earlier this summer in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.
Adek Berry AFP/Getty Images

"Three U.S. Forces-Afghanistan service members died following an attack by an individual wearing an Afghan uniform in southwest Afghanistan today," according to a statement from the International Security Assistance Force - Afghanistan.

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Author Interviews
4:45 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Dr. Siri Books Began With A Surprise Hospital Stay

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 6:28 am

Author Colin Cotterill believes in fate. Though he didn't know it at the time, fate seemed to determine early on that he would write the Dr. Siri books, a series of mysteries that follows a 70-something Laotian country coroner. (This piece initially aired August 15, 2008 on Morning Edition).

U.S.
3:24 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Sikh Shooting Puts Focus On Hate Groups At Home

Rescue workers stand in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City after an explosion on April 19, 1995. The bombing killed 168 people.
David Longstreath AP

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 6:28 am

The slaying of six people at a Sikh temple by a gunman with ties to white supremacists has raised questions about the scope of domestic terrorism — and what law enforcement is doing to stop it.

Federal law enforcement agencies cracked down hard on homegrown extremists after the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, which killed 168 people, including 19 children at a day care center. Many leaders went to prison, died or went bankrupt.

But in recent years, the spread of the Internet, the worsening economy and changing demographic patterns have been giving new voice to hate groups.

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Business
3:23 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Why Evading U.S. Rules May 'Tempt' Foreign Banks

Police leave the Standard Chartered Bank's offices Tuesday in London. The bank has been accused of making billions of dollars' worth of transactions with the Iranian regime.
Matthew Lloyd Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 2:42 pm

The allegations this week against London-based Standard Chartered Bank raise questions, not just about the bank's viability but also about the efficacy of U.S. laws when it comes to foreign banks. Standard Chartered allegedly violated U.S. sanctions against Iran, and regulators said the bank's executives lied to investigators as part of a cover-up.

The case serves as yet another reminder that U.S. regulations, which have strengthened since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, apparently did not deter foreign banks from laundering money through their U.S. operations.

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