Education
8:00 am
Mon August 20, 2012

LX Time Machine goes back to OTR - Peaslee Neighborhood Center

Peaslee Neighborhood Center in Over the Rhine
Jim Nolan

One of my favorite neighborhoods to cover was Over the Rhine.  I lived in OTR for 3 and half years and look forward to transplanting my family back downtown.  Every morning on my way to work I would hear laughter coming from Peaslee Neighborhood Center.  It was a joy to revisit this interview.  

The Two-Way
7:57 am
Mon August 20, 2012

In Afghanistan, A Struggle To Stem Deaths From 'Insider Attacks'

Aug. 13: At Dover Air Force Base in Delaware, the remains of Marine Lance Cpl. Gregory T. Buckley are carried during a dignified transfer. He was killed in a "green on blue" attack.
Mark Wilson Getty Images
  • Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson speaks with David Greene on 'Morning Edition'

The killing Sunday in Afghanistan of an American soldier in what officials say was the latest in a series of "green on blue" attacks by Afghans in uniform against coalition personnel was the 10th in just the past two weeks.

There have been "30 such attacks so far this year, up from 11 in 2011," The Associated Press writes.

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Participation Nation
7:03 am
Mon August 20, 2012

Kids Garden In Wallingford, Conn.

Students enjoy the fruits of their labors in Wallingford.
Courtesy of Wallingford Public Schools

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 10:33 am

From the moment she joined the Wallingford school district, food service director Sharlene Wong was determined to start a garden. Her dream has become a reality: a community garden is now flourishing at Highland Elementary School.

Wallingford students will not only be eating the many vegetables grown on school grounds, they'll also be planting, tending and harvesting them.

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PG-13: Risky Reads
7:03 am
Mon August 20, 2012

Slaughter In The Subway: A Tale Of New York Terror

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 4:12 pm

Victor LaValle's latest novel is called The Devil in Silver.

"I have seen the future of horror ... and it is named Clive Barker."

It was the mid '80s. I was in my local comic book store. I remember seeing those words on the paperback cover of a book. The image of a cheap, rubber-looking mask with its mouth hanging open and its eyes empty was on the front. A purple light glowed behind the mask. It wasn't frightening. The cover looked crappy. And the name, Clive Barker, meant nothing to me. I might've passed it by if not for the name under the blurb: Stephen King.

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Michelle Trudeau began her radio career in 1981, filing stories for NPR from Beijing and Shanghai, China, where she and her husband lived for two years. She began working as a science reporter and producer for NPR's Science Desk since 1982. Trudeau's news reports and feature stories, which cover the areas of human behavior, child development, the brain sciences, and mental health, air on NPR's Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

David Greene is NPR's Morning Programming Host/Correspondent. In this role he is the primary substitute host for Morning Edition as well as Weekend Edition Saturday and Sunday. When he is not hosting he brings his deep reporting talents to these programs.

First And Main
3:26 am
Mon August 20, 2012

Weary Wis. Union Workers Face Another Campaign

Joan Kaeding is a reference assistant at the Oshkosh Public Library. NPR talked to her at New Moon Cafe in downtown Oshkosh. She says she's fielding lots of questions at the library about the new health care law.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 4:37 pm

As the presidential election nears, Morning Edition is visiting swing counties in swing states for our series First and Main. We're listening to voters where they live — to understand what's shaping their thinking this election year.

This week, we're visiting Winnebago County, Wis. — a county that went Republican in the 2004 presidential election and flipped to the Democrats in 2008.

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Crime In The City
3:26 am
Mon August 20, 2012

Robert Crais: LA Is A 'Natural Canvas' For Nightmare

The canals in LA's Venice neighborhood serve as the scene of a murder in Robert Crais' 2011 novel, The Sentry.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 1:50 pm

It's been a few decades, and many published books, but Robert Crais can tell you exactly when mystery writing first caught his attention: He was a bright 15-year-old living in Baton Rouge, La., when he read Raymond Chandler's The Little Sister, which depicted the shady side of sunny Los Angeles through the eyes of private investigator Philip Marlowe.

Since then, Crais has found huge success with his own crime novels, also set in LA. The city is the perfect canvas for a modern mystery, and Crais' eyes still grow wide when he talks about what Chandler painted on it.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:25 am
Mon August 20, 2012

Search For Parkinson's Genes Turns To Online Social Networking

Submitting a DNA sample to networking company 23andMe entails spitting a saliva sample into a plastic vial.
23andMe

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 1:50 pm

There's a growing interest in what our genes say about our health. And in recent years, quite a few companies have sprung up to help us listen with the help of personalized DNA tests.

For a few hundred dollars and a vial of spit, these companies will search your DNA for sequences that predict your physical traits, your response to certain drugs and your risk for any number of diseases.

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Art & Design
3:25 am
Mon August 20, 2012

Hopper's Pensive Lady In Pink Travels The World

Edward Hopper's wife, Josephine N. Hopper, served as his model for 1952's Morning Sun.
Columbus Museum of Art/Howald Fund

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 1:50 pm

It's one of the ultimate images of summer: a woman in a short, pink slip sits on a bed, her knees pulled up to her chest, gazing out a window. Her hair is tucked back into a bun. Her bare arms rest lightly on her bare legs.

Edward Hopper painted her in 1952 for a work called Morning Sun. The picture has been widely reproduced for decades. But on a recent visit to its home at the Columbus Museum of Art in Columbus, Ohio, it was nowhere to be found.

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