It's All Politics
6:44 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Obama's Post-Charlotte Bounce May Owe More To TV Ads Than Convention

President Obama gives his acceptance speech at the Democratic National Convention.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 11:24 am

It's become conventional wisdom that President Obama's new lead in the polls is a bounce, coming out of the Democratic convention in Charlotte, N.C.

But an analysis from the Wesleyan Media Project suggests that the bounce might be due to TV ads as much as grand speeches. The Obama campaign and its allies laid out $21.1 million for TV during the two weeks of the party conventions. Over that same stretch, Republican Mitt Romney and his backers spent significantly less, $12.9 million.

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All Tech Considered
6:22 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

New iPhone Plug Spells Inconvenience For Users, Change For Accessory Makers

The Lightning connector replaces Apple's 30-pin connector.
Apple

I kind of think of Philz Coffee in Palo Alto, Calif., as the epicenter of Apple fanatics. It's so hip, only hand-poured specialty blends are sold here.

Every day dozens of techie types come to Philz for coffee and then lounge around on the leather sofa sipping away, often with Apple products scattered in front of them.

Yeliz Ustabas has an Apple laptop perched next to her and an iPhone balanced on her knee.

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Economy
5:54 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Poverty Rate Unchanged, But Still Historically High

A child waits with a box of food at a mobile food bank in Oswego, N.Y., in June. New census data show that 46.2 million people in the U.S. lived below the poverty line last year.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 9:45 pm

The U.S. poverty rate last year was unchanged from the year before, according to new figures Wednesday from the Census Bureau. But that still means almost 1 in 6 Americans was poor.

The new data show that 46.2 million people in the U.S. lived below the poverty line — about $23,000 for a family of four. The number of poor was almost exactly the same as it was the year before, but still historically high.

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It's All Politics
5:53 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Rove's Crossroads GPS Gets Explicit In Anti-Obama Air War

Karl Rove co-founded the Republican superPAC Crossroads GPS.
Tom Pennington Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 11:21 am

For months, the tax-exempt Crossroads GPS has argued that its anti-Obama ads were merely issue ads and not political ads. No more. Today the group went up with ads explicitly telling viewers to vote against President Obama.

Co-founded by Republican operative Karl Rove, the group began running a 30-second spot Wednesday morning in Nevada that blames a weak economy and poor housing market on Obama and ends with the wording: "This election ... don't blow another vote on Obama."

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The Two-Way
5:45 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Poverty Rate Remains Flat, Says Census Bureau

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:27 pm

In 2011, the poverty rate in the United States remained steady and the number of uninsured Americans decreased, the Census Bureau said today. That means that more than 46 million Americans lived below the poverty line last year.

NPR's Pam Fessler filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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Shots - Health Blog
5:30 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Worst Of West Nile Epidemic Appears To Be Over

Technicians with the Contra Costa County Mosquito and Vector Control District spray insecticide in Brentwood, Calif., last month. Workers fogged areas of the county that had an increase in the numbers of mosquitoes carrying the West Nile virus.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

The numbers for West Nile virus cases continue to rise, up 35 percent in the last week. But the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is confident the nation has turned the corner on its worst-ever epidemic of West Nile virus disease.

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Shots - Health Blog
5:07 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Portland, Ore., Becomes Latest Fluoride Battleground

Demonstrator China Starshine holds up signs outside of City Hall in Portland last week.
Ross William Hamilton The Oregonian/AP

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 5:58 pm

Over jeers and cheers from the audience, commissioners on the Portland, Ore., City Council voted Wednesday to add fluoride to the city's drinking water starting in 2014.

Portland is the largest American city that doesn't add fluoride to its drinking water. But some groups have raised questions about the possible risks from fluoridation and oppose its use.

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The Two-Way
3:44 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Syrian Documentary Producer Orwa Nyrabia Is Freed; Was Arrested Two Weeks Ago

A Syrian documentary film producer whose disappearance two weeks ago prompted concerns for his safety and a letter of support from the Toronto International Film Festival is now free, according to reports.

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The Salt
3:18 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Have Lobster, Will Travel — And Race The Clock

An overabundance of lobsters in Maine due to early shedding of shells has driven down prices to record lows. That's good for consumers.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:47 pm

This summer in Maine, I ate more lobster than at any other time I've been there – twice in one day on a couple of occasions. We lobster lovers had the glut of soft-shells, which started in June as the lobsters began to shed earlier and faster than usual, to thank for the more affordable market price of around $4 or less a pound.

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Africa
3:04 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Security, Diplomacy A Difficult Balance For U.S.

An armed police officer stood guard on a machine gun-mounted jeep outside the U.S. embassy in Manila, Philippines, amid warnings of a terrorist plot June 6, 2007.
Romeo Ranoco Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 11:07 am

The order to tighten security at all U.S. diplomatic posts around the globe following attacks in the Middle East may be necessary, but it will come at a cost.

There has been an enormous increase in security precautions at American embassies and consulates over the past 30 years, and the bubble that many diplomats now operate under makes it more difficult for them to interact with people in other countries, limiting their ability to gather information and promote the American "brand."

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