Europe may be in major financial and political turmoil, but in France, it's a tweet that has the country in an uproar.

The political storm erupted Tuesday when first lady Valerie Trierweiler tweeted her support for a candidate running in Sunday's parliamentary elections.

That may sound harmless, but the candidate she encouraged is running to unseat prominent politician Segolene Royal, the former partner of President Francois Hollande and the mother of his four children.

What do women want, electorally speaking?

We know that women, like men, are "not some monolithic bloc," to quote the current occupant of the White House.

But as a group they are reliably influential voters, more risk-averse than men, and — pollsters tell us — generally more likely than the opposite sex to vote for Democrats, oppose the use of military force and support government programs.

In 2008, unmarried women, one of the nation's fastest-growing demographic groups, were a key to Barack Obama's presidential win.

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency has brought formal doping charges against cyclist Lance Armstrong.

The Washington Post, which broke the story, reports that as a result "Armstrong has been immediately banned from competition in triathlons."

The Post adds:

The Justice Department is walking away from its case against John Edwards.

Federal prosecutors have announced they will not retry the former Democratic presidential candidate on campaign finance charges. The decision comes soon after jury was unable to reach a verdict.

Government lawyers asked Judge Catherine Eagles to dismiss the case with prejudice, meaning they will not take another bite at the apple and try to resurrect their high profile case.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott is defending his effort to prevent non-U.S. citizens from voting in his state after the Justice Department filed a lawsuit to stop him on Tuesday.

Scott told NPR's Michel Martin on Tell Me More Wednesday that after learning his state didn't verify the citizenship status of registered voters, he's trying to ensure that the ballots of U.S. citizens aren't diminished:

Scientists Wednesday unveiled the first catalog of the bacteria, viruses and other microorganisms that populate every nook and cranny of the human body.

Researchers hope the advance marks an important step towards understanding how microbes help make humans human.

The human body contains about 100 trillion cells, but only maybe one in 10 of those cells is actually — human. The rest are from bacteria, viruses and other microorganisms.

If Twitter has its way, "That's a clown question, bro" will join "Don't tase me, bro" in the annals of popular rhetorical comebacks.

"That's a clown question, bro" comes from 19-year-old baseball phenom Bryce Harper. That's what he told a Canadian journalist yesterday, following his second three-hit game in a row.

The nearly 40 percent drop in median household net worth between 2007 and 2010 the Federal Reserve reported earlier this week was unarguably an arresting statistic. It confirmed for millions what they already knew, that the Great Recession and its aftermath have been a financial setback with few parallels.

CNN, which has been battered in the ratings game, announced today that it was canceling its politics show "John King, USA."

Wolf Blitzer's "The Situation Room" will expand to three hours at the end of this month to cover the gap.

The New York Times reports:

James Hetfield, lead singer and guitarist for the heavy metal band Metallica, makes a straight-forward appeal for help in finding a fan's killer in a new public service ad produced for the FBI, Virginia and local law enforcement agencies.

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Congressional Healthcare Bill Response Tracker

NPR and member stations around the country have compiled a database of Congressional members’ positions on the bill.

President Trump's Revised Travel Order

President Trump has signed a revised executive order, once again barring travel to the United States from six majority-Muslim countries and suspending the U.S. refugee program.

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Major League Baseball

It's Time To Preview Opening Day In Cincinnati And The 2017 Reds

Our unofficial holiday, Opening Day in Cincinnati , is just one week away. Joining us to discuss how the Reds will perform this season are Hal McCoy with the Dayton Daily News ; sports writer John Erardi ; Cincinnati Reds historian Greg Rhodes ; and WVXU reporter and avid baseball fan Howard Wilkinson .

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StoryCorps Coming To Cincinnati!

The national storytelling project visits Cincinnati from April 20-May 19

NPR's Tiny Desk Contest

NPR Music has again invited musicians from all across the country to submit videos for the Tiny Desk Contest, and again, the Greater Cincinnati area has been very well represented.

XPoNential Radio on WVXU HD2

Turn up the Volume, Kick Back and Immerse Yourself in the Music. Tune to XPoNential Radio and embark on a journey of great music discovery 24/7.

Politically Speaking

Howard Wilkinson brings you the latest in local and national politics.

Podcasts Chosen Just For Our Listeners

Looking for a new podcast? Check out some of the best from NPR, other public radio program providers and picks from the WVXU staff!

Show Us What You Know

Take part in our weekly Ask Me Another Trivia Challenge and you might win a valuable prize from our famed Closet Of Leftover Thank You Gifts!

Democracy & Me for Educators

WVXU's Democracy & Me is a great resource for teaching the political and electoral process in The United States.