Liquid Assets: Tapping the Region's Water Cash Flow

Credit WCPO

In a unique collaboration between members of the WCPO reporting team and the news team of 91.7 WVXU, a week of special reports begins Monday examining perhaps the greatest, most profitable resource in the Cincinnati area: water.

This is the first such collaboration between WCPO and WVXU, and this topic was chosen because of its dramatic impact to this entire region, both in terms of the daily need and use of water, but also because water technology, distribution, and related entrepreneurship is a growing component of the local economy.

Thomas More College

The Duke Energy Foundation is handing out grants totaling $500,000 to fund water quality research and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education at the University of Cincinnati and Thomas More College.

Each school is getting $250,000.

UC plans to use the money to complete a groundwater quality monitoring station and create a summer environmental research training program for K-12 science teachers.


Greater Cincinnati's Water Technology Innovation Cluster Confluence is putting on a private summit Wednesday to address ways of keeping harmful algae blooms out of the local water supply.

Just this August a toxic algal bloom in Lake Erie near the Toledo water intake prevented nearly 500,000 residents from getting their drinking water for three days.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

The Executive Director of Greater Cincinnati Water Works and the Metropolitan Sewer District, Tony Parrot, will participate in a national discussion on U.S. water infrastructure Wednesday in Washington D.C.

Parrot joins the U.S. EPA's Nancy Stoner, Veolia Water North America and Mark Strauss with American Waterin the Value of Water Coalition's national panel discussion to help other communities deal with crumbling water and wastewater infrastructure.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Think of it as a big laboratory where new water technology is tested. The EPA's Testing and Evaluation Center, right next to the Metropolitan Sewer District, played host to a group of people who wanted to figure out better ways to solve their water problems.

Richard Seline  with the Texas Water Cluster Initiative and others are now armed with new information after their visit to Cincinnati. He says, "You kind of see around the country who's doing what cool things with technology."

Ann Thompson / WVXU

The chemical spill affecting water supplies in a large portion of West Virginia has the Greater Cincinnati Water Works keeping a close eye on local water quality.

"Currently the spill has not reached the Cincinnati area," says Communications Officer Michele Ralston.

The spill occurred in the Elk River which is a tributary of the Kanawha River. The Kanawha flows into the Ohio River at Point Pleasant, West Virginia.