Howard Wilkinson: Politics and More

Howard Wilkinson joined the WVXU news team as the politics reporter and columnist in April 2012 , after 30 years of covering local, state and national politics for The Cincinnati Enquirer. On this page, you will find his political blog, his weekly column, Politically Speaking; the Monday morning political chats with news director Maryanne Zeleznik and other news coverage by Wilkinson. A native of Dayton, Ohio, Wilkinson has covered every Ohio gubernatorial race since 1974, as well as 14 presidential nominating conventions. Along with politics, Wilkinson also covered the 2001 Cincinnati race riots, the Lucasville prison riot in 1993, the Air Canada plane crash at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport in 1983, and the 1997 Ohio River flooding. And, given his passion for baseball, you might even find some stories about the Cincinnati Reds here from time to time. 

Four candidates - including the incumbent  - are vying in Tuesday's primary election to become the mayor of Covington, a city, which, with about 41,000 residents, is by far the largest of Northern Kentucky's cities.

The top two finishers in Tuesday's primary will face off in the November election for a two-year term as mayor.  The mayor with four elected city commissioners set the city's agenda and direction.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about how a race between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton might play out in the critical swing state of Ohio this fall.

Donald Trump is going to be the Republican nominee for president. Anyone with an elementary grasp of mathematics has known that for some time now.

The once-gargantuan field of GOP presidential candidates dwindled in recent weeks to three – Trump, Ted Cruz and John Kasich. And, after Trump's thumping of Cruz Tuesday in Indiana, it was finally down to one, with first Cruz and then Kasich falling on their swords and crying "uncle."

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning on Ohio Gov. John Kasich's withdrawal from the GOP presidential contest. Why did Kasich fold up his tent and come home? Because there was no point in going on. 

Provided

Soon after Tuesday's Indiana primaries, both Ted Cruz and John Kasich suspended their campaigns, leaving Donald Trump the apparent GOP nominee. And even though Bernie Sanders pulled out a narrow win over Hillary Clinton, it is all but certain she will be the Democratic nominee. So at this point it looks as if the candidates who will run in the general election are two people who, according to recent polls, most Americans just do not like all that much. And members of both parties are left asking, "Now what?" 

Hamilton County Board of Elections

The Hamilton County Board of Elections unanimously voted Tuesday morning on a lease agreement for a new home in Norwood, on the site of the former General Motors plant.

In January, the board of elections, now located at 824 Broadway Downtown, will move all of its operations into Norwood's Central Parke office complex on Smith Road.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked Monday morning with Jay Hanselman about Tuesday's presidential primary in Indiana. Will Hoosier Republicans help Donald Trump secure the GOP presidential nomination; or will they knock him off track by going for Ted Cruz of Texas?

The past seven days may well have been the most bizarre week of presidential politics in our lifetimes.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the arrangement announced Sunday night by the campaigns of Ted Cruz and John Kasich aimed at stopping Donald Trump from winning a first-ballot victory at the Republican National Convention. Kasich will give Cruz a clear path in Indiana's May 3 primary, while Cruz will get out of Kasich's way in the primaries of Oregon and New Mexico. 

City of Dayton, City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati has double the population of Dayton, Ohio, yet the cities share similar characteristics and face many of the same challenges and opportunities. WVXU political reporter Howard Wilkinson joins us as we talk with Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley and Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley about working together for the benefit of both cities, and their thoughts on the future for what could one day become a combined Cincinnati-Dayton metropolitan area. 

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