Yvette Simpson

Howard Wilkinson

After months of speculation, Cincinnati Council Member Yvette Simpson announced Wednesday morning that she will take on incumbent John Cranley in next year's mayor's race.

WKRC-TV

WKRC-TV will air a commercial-free hour Monday on  “Childhood Poverty: Cincinnati’s Crisis,” a topic explored by Channel 12 reporters since last fall.

Anchor Brad Johansen will host the discussion with local poverty experts before an invitation-only audience at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center 7 p.m. Monday.

Provided

  For their book, “Running for Office: Why Young Americans are Turned Off to PoliticsJennifer Lawless and Richard Fox asked more than 4,000 young Americans if they were interested in running for office one day. Eighty-nine percent of respondents said no. So what drives someone to run for political office at a time in their life when most of their peers are focusing their time and energy on building their careers and starting families?

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Last April, 42 people were arrested in a three-week blitz against prostitution along the McMicken Avenue corridor. Sex trafficking continues to be a problem in the city, with the West McMicken, Price Hill and Walnut Hills areas experiencing the most prostitution activity. 

There are competing proposals for offering parental leave to Cincinnati city workers.  

Council Members Yvette Simpson and Chris Seelbach want to offer four weeks of paid leave after the birth or adoption of a child.  

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley, who campaigned and won on a promise to kill the $133 million streetcar project, cracked open to the door to a deal with streetcar supporters that could allow the project to go forward.

In a city hall press conference this morning, Cranley said he would work with streetcar supporters to find institutions or foundations in the private sector to pay the approximately $80 million it would take to maintain and operate the system.

It is not something the city can do without private help, Cranley said.

City Manager Milton Dohoney signed the parking lease agreement Tuesday afternoon that will bring a $92 million up-front payment to city coffers, but council may still make some changes to the agreement.

Tuesday, two Cincinnati council members - Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls and Yvette Simpson - were circulating motions  asking the city administration to come up with a new plan for use of the $92 million in up-front money from the parking lease agreement.