youth programs

It’s hard to believe, but Elementz, Cincinnati’s hip hop youth services organization, is celebrating its 8th anniversary this year. They moved into a new, larger space last year and continue to expand programs designed to keep our city’s young people safe, off the streets, and moving towards an educated, positive life. Brother Abdullah Powell, the creative director of Elementz, is in the studio with Mark Perzel to talk about the past eight years and what he sees for the organization in the coming years.

Jay Hanselman

A Cincinnati Councilwoman and members of a youth commission are launching what they call a groundbreaking study on the city's youth.

Yvettte Simpson said the study will focus on six areas: crime, poverty and homelessness, education, workforce development, health and developmental opportunities.  

Simpson and several commission members announced the project during a City Hall press conference.

Using Squash as a teaching tool

Mar 15, 2013

Taking a new approach to positively impact the lives of some of Cincinnati’s at-risk youth, Neal Tew has opened the T Squash Center and implemented Queen City Squash, a scholastic squash league that will teach not just the sport, but sportsmanship, teamwork, responsibility and more. Neal Tew is in The Front Row with Betsy Ross to discuss his new eastside facility and their opening events on Saturday, March 16.


The Baker Hunt Art & Cultural Center in Covington is host to a myriad of classes, performances, and special events, and with the holidays fast approaching, they have an exciting schedule coming up. Lee Hay welcomes in the center’s executive director, Ray Kingsbury, to talk about the center’s mission and what all is coming up in the next couple of months.