WNKU-FM

Joe Mullins and the Radio Ramblers

Like his father Paul "Moon" Mullins, Joe Mullins enjoys playing bluegrass music – on the radio or on stage.

Urban Artifact brewery's radio format featuring local and national independent musicians will be added to the WVXU-HD2 digital subchannel on noon Tuesday, June 5.

Radio Artifact replaces XPoNentional Radio, a national adult album alternative (Triple-A) format broadcast by Philadelphia public radio station WXPN-FM.

John Kiesewetter

Even more fun! Bob "The Producer" Berry says he's attending the "Remembering Radio’s Rock Rivalries" program Sunday along with Eddie Fingers, Jay Gilbert, Mike McConnell, Pat Barry and Kevin "Doc" Wolfe. Berry worked for WKRQ-FM/WKRC-AM before joining Fingers on the WEBN-FM "Dawn Patrol."

The program is 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 28, at the main public library downtown.

John Kiesewetter

Another year down the tubes! Here's a look at 2017 TV/Media/Radio/Movies stories of 2017 from A to Z:

A is for abolishing the area's admired Adult Album Alternative (Triple A) station, WNKU-FM.

John Kiesewetter

There's not much left at WNKU-FM for broadcast classes or students hoping to start a campus or internet station.

Northern Kentucky University sold most of the WNKU-FM studio equipment with the transmitters for FM 89.7 on campus; FM 105.9 and AM 910 in Middletown; and FM 104.1 in Portsmouth.

WNKU-FM

Before beloved WNKU-FM vanishes into thin air at 6 p.m. Thursday Sept. 28, here's another installment of remembrances from loyal listeners and former staffers.

WNKU-FM will play requests and listener comments all day Thursday on FM 105.9, which has been sold by the university to Grant County Broadcasters. A new station debuts Monday, Oct. 2.

WVXU-FM archives

Middletown's historic Sorg Opera House reopens with a concert Sunday, two weeks before Cincinnati's Music Hall's grand re-opening.

John Kiesewetter

The end is near: WNKU announced Thursday that it will cease broadcasting at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 28, on Middletown's WNKN-FM (105.9), the university's last signal.

A new format will be heard Monday, Oct. 2, on FM 105.9, says Jeff Ziesmann, who agreed to buy Northern Kentucky University's last radio asset July 19.

Former WUBE-FM and WGRR-FM part-time DJ Gina Matthews takes over the 10 a.m.-2 p.m. shift on Dry Ridge classic country WNKR-FM (106.7) on Monday, Sept. 11.

John Kiesewetter

WNKU-FM won't be making a big deal about losing its original frequency (FM 89.7) at 8:59 a.m. Friday late Friday night, since the beloved station still will be heard until late October on Middletown's powerful WNKN-FM (105.9) and streaming.

But I will.... since "it's the beginning of the end," as I wrote earlier this week.

John Kiesewetter

Update 8/17/17 at 8:40 p.m.:  Northern Kentucky University issued a press release Thursday evening stating WNKU's programming on 89.7 FM will end Friday morning at 8:59 a.m.

Original post: It's the beginning of the end.

WNKU-FM stops broadcasting on its original frequency (FM 89.7) at 12:01 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 19 – although the station's beloved adult album alternative (Triple-A) format will continue to be heard throughout most of Northern Kentucky and Greater Cincinnati on Middletown's powerful WNKN-FM (105.9) and streamed on line.

WNKU-FM

UPDATE 7/19/17  9:00 p.m.

Jeff Ziesmann, buyer of WNKN-FM from Northern Kentucky University says there was no agreement to keep the Triple-A format on the station, as said after the Wednesday afternoon NKU Board of Regents meeting. "Very early on in negotiations, we discussed keeping the format provided NKU would finance the purchase of the station. It quickly rejected the proposal," Ziesmann said. 

John Kiesewetter

When Pete Rose and the Big Red Machine returned to Great American Ball Park Saturday, so did public address announcer Joe Zerhusen.

WVXU-FM

Let me get this out of the way first: I've been listening to public broadcasting for 40-plus years, and I would write this column whether or not I work for Cincinnati Public Radio and WVXU-FM now.

Nobody welcomes public broadcasting fundraising drives, which interrupt our favorite formats, but Maryanne Zeleznik and Jay Hanselman do it better than anyone else I've heard. They truly put the most fun into fundraising, of all the Cincinnati non-commercial stations.

WNKU-FM

Update 3:15 p.m. Thursday, May 4:  Northern Kentucky University has issued a revised comment today about the status of selling Middletown's WNKN-FM (105.9), which indicates the university is in serious talks with a prospective buyer.

John Kiesewetter

Reds public address announcer Joe Zerhusen went on the disabled list Friday to seek treatment for a "health issue," he says.

Zerhusen, the PA announcer since Great American Ball Park opened in 2003, told me Friday he will miss the remaining games this weekend, and most of the 14 games in May.

WNKU-FM

From Aaron Sharpe, WNKU-FM general manager:

This Weekend, We Say Goodbye to Some of WNKU's Most Beloved Programs

Well, there's just no good way to say this. Several of WNKU's longest-running and most popular weekend programs will air for the last time this Saturday and Sunday.

Jim Nolan/WVXU

Each Friday on Cincinnati Edition, we review and discuss the people, stories and events that are affecting the Tri-state. 

WVXU

With WNKU-FM soon to be sold and silenced, Cincinnati Public Radio will add a national adult album alternative (Triple-A) format broadcast on 91.7 WVXU-HD2 and streamed on wvxu.org starting 10 a.m. Friday.

"WNKU has provided an invaluable service to its listeners and to the local music community it serves and it will be missed," said Richard Eiswerth, Cincinnati Public Radio general manager and CEO.

"With the loss of the Triple-A format at WNKU-FM, we see that as a vacuum that – in order to fulfill our mission —we should step in and do our best to serve."

WNKU.org

Valentine's Day will be remembered as the day the music died at WNKU-FM.

Sadly, it's over, as I had expected since Northern Kentucky University President Geoffrey Mearns announced 10 months ago that he would "explore the possibility of a sale of WNKU-FM and its assets."

After nearly 32 years of rockin' the airwaves to an adult album alternative (Triple-A) beat -- a unique blend of alternative, folk-rock, classic rock and bluegrass with a hourly dose of homegrown artists -- the university sold WNKU-FM (89.7) to a religious broadcaster, as I figured.

WNKU.org

WNKU-FM's unique adult album alternative format will be replaced by religious programming later this year after the Northern Kentucky University Board of Regents Tuesday voted unanimously to sell two of the school's three FM stations: 

WCPO-TV

Catching you up on the Comings & Goings of Cincinnati TV/radio personalities:

CHERI LAWSON: The last member of WNKU-FM's news team, "Community Stories" reporter Cheri Lawson, was let go last week. After 7-1/2 years and "numerous NPR features and spots for NPR," acting general manager Aaron Sharpe and program director Liz Felix "gave me the boot…. I was told my stories didn't fit the format. No one ever asked me to do it differently," Lawson says.

WNKU-FM

Former WOXY-FM DJ Barb Abney returns to the airwaves here through next week to help her friends at WNKU-FM.

Abney, a 10-year veteran of Minnesota's Public Radio's "The Current" after her stint at 97X, will visit with WNKU-FM music hosts during the station's fall fund drive.

WNKU-FM

Sean O'Mealy has resigned as WNKU-FM general manager effective Oct. 7, after 19 months on the job.

He leaves four months after Northern Kentucky University hired Kalil & Co., a Tucson-based media broker, to explore the possibility of selling WNKU-FM (89.7), WNKN-FM in Middletown (formerly WPFB-FM) and WNKE-FM in Portsmouth (formerly WPAY-FM).

WNKU-FM

Northern Kentucky University has given Tucson-based Kalil & Co., one of the nation's biggest media brokers, a one-year contract to explore selling the three WNKU-FM stations.

Sacred Heart Radio

Northern Kentucky University is selling Middletown's WPFB-AM (910) to Sacred Heart Radio, the Catholic station broadcasting on WNOP-AM (740).

The Middletown AM station, which reaches north of Dayton and west of Oxford, will allow Sacred Heart Radio "to cover all the major cities in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. It's a monster signal during the day," says Bill Levitt, general manager. 

WNKU-FM

Northern Kentucky University President Geoffrey Mearns says he will "explore the possibility of a sale of WNKU-FM and its assets" in light of "the very real prospect of significant funding cuts from the state."

WNKU-FM

Veteran program director and music host John Patrick has left WNKU-FM (89.7) after 13-1/2 years.

Patrick, hired in September 2002, also was executive producer of the station's "Studio 89" TV show. He starts this weekend as a part-time staffer here at WVXU-FM, and will continue as a part-time producer/engineer for the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Radio Network.

Matt Sledge

Why did WNKU-FM drop “UnderCurrents,” “E-Town” and “Little Steven’s Underground Garage” and move “The Real Mary Peale” and the “World  Café?”

“It’s fairly straight forward,” says Sean O’Mealy, general manager. “The objective is to appeal to and engage with a larger/wider group of music lovers in the Greater Cincinnati region who otherwise are ignored by mainstream radio.”

The new fall lineup implemented this week features more local shows. Former WOXY-FM host Matt Sledge will be heard 2-7 p.m. Saturday, with Peale moving to 5-8 p.m. Sunday nights. She had hosted  “Jelly Pudding” Sunday nights on WOFX-FM (92.5) before joining WNKU-FM in 2009.  "Mr Rhythm Man" now airs 7-10 p.m. Saturday, and Katie Laur's  "Music From The Hills Of Home" airs 8-11 p.m. Sunday. 

This is the second round of changes made by O’Mealy since he arrived in February.

WNKU-FM

Long before Cate Blanchett, George Clooney, Don Cheadle or Michael Douglas shot movies here,  Lori Holladay helped Hollywood discover Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky.

Holladay, who died July 21 at age 59, scouted locations for John Sayles’ “Eight Men Out” in 1987 and the Tom Cruise-Dustin Hoffman “Rain Man” in 1988.

Local production companies joined forces to help those films, which resulted in the creation of the Cincinnati Film Commission with Holladay as first executive. Soon followed an impressive list of films shot here through the early 1990s.