WKRP in Cincinnati

Shout! Factory

So I had this crazy dream -- and it's about to become reality – about a concert saluting the great rock 'n' roll and pop music heard on "WKRP in Cincinnati."

Provided by Chad Lambert

Before he wrote comic books and advertising, Chad Lambert was living his dream – and it nearly killed him.

Lambert was a radio host-producer for several Cincinnati and Dayton stations -- at the same time -- before joining Gary Burbank's afternoon radio show team on WLW-AM.

Wikimedia Commons

From The Honeymooners to Modern Family, Good Times to Black-ish, Seinfeld to the Simpsons, television comedies have changed and evolved to both reflect and influence current American culture.

NPR

Thanks, Grant Tinker, for all the great TV.

Tinker, who died Monday at age 90, was NBC chairman 1981-86 and co-founder of the MTM studio in 1970 with wife Mary Tyler Moore.

Provided by Bob Gerding

The opening shot of the "Marauders" trailer gives a bird's eye view of the Roebling Suspension bridge, thanks to veteran Cincinnati video pioneer Bob Gerding.

Gerding will talk with me on WVXU-FM's "Cincinnati Edition" 1-2 p.m. Thursday about how his drones provided cool aerial shots to "Marauders," the bank heist thriller opening July 1 starring Bruce Willis, Christopher Meloni, Dave Bautista and Adrian Grenier.

“As God is my witness, I thought turkeys could fly…”

Those words were first spoken on TV 37 years ago today after “WKRP in Cincinnati” dropped live turkeys, which hit the “ground like sacks of wet cement,” at a shopping mall parking lot in a Thanksgiving promotion gone horribly, hilariously wrong on this date in TV Kiese history, Oct. 30, 1978.

“They’re crashing to the earth right in front of our eyes!” says WKRP newsman Les Nessman  in this clip below from the most memorable episode of “WKRP” (1978-82).

CBS Television

On this date in TV Kiese history…

Sept. 18, 1978: “WKRP in Cincinnati” premieres on CBS with the first of a two-part episode about new program director Andy Travis (Gary Sandy) switching from boring elevator music to rock ’n’ roll.

Although never a big ratings hit, “WKRP” had a loyal audience for four seasons because of its great writing, actual rock music (selected by the actor DJs) and great cast: Howard Hesseman, Gordon Jump, Loni Anderson, Richard Sanders, Tim Reid, Frank Bonner, Jan Smithers and Sandy.

Baby, if you’ve ever wondered:  Atlanta advertising executive Hugh Wilson had never been to Cincinnati before creating the show. He based the series on an  Atlanta radio station.