water

Texas141 / Wikimedia Commons

Miami Valley Hospital has found lead in its water during routine testing. The hospital is temporarily discontinuing use of water in the affected parts of its facility.

The Greater Cincinnati Water Works has sent out 1,543 test kits so residents can check the lead level in their drinking water. So far, 853 have been analyzed and 21 properties have levels that are concerning.  

The ultimate in environmentally friendly housing might be a structure made partially of water. There is such a house in Kecskemet, Hungary. That's near where the architect who designed it grew up.

Matyas Gutai, PhD  got his inspiration to build the structure from open air hot baths in Tokyo, where despite the cold temperature outside, it was kept comfortably warm inside.

Wikipedia

Greater Cincinnati's Water Technology Innovation Cluster Confluence is putting on a private summit Wednesday to address ways of keeping harmful algae blooms out of the local water supply.

Just this August a toxic algal bloom in Lake Erie near the Toledo water intake prevented nearly 500,000 residents from getting their drinking water for three days.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

The Executive Director of Greater Cincinnati Water Works and the Metropolitan Sewer District, Tony Parrot, will participate in a national discussion on U.S. water infrastructure Wednesday in Washington D.C.

Parrot joins the U.S. EPA's Nancy Stoner, Veolia Water North America and Mark Strauss with American Waterin the Value of Water Coalition's national panel discussion to help other communities deal with crumbling water and wastewater infrastructure.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Think of it as a big laboratory where new water technology is tested. The EPA's Testing and Evaluation Center, right next to the Metropolitan Sewer District, played host to a group of people who wanted to figure out better ways to solve their water problems.

Richard Seline  with the Texas Water Cluster Initiative and others are now armed with new information after their visit to Cincinnati. He says, "You kind of see around the country who's doing what cool things with technology."

Good Morning, TriState

Oct 7, 2013

As part of our Liquid Assets partnership with WCPO, WVXU’s Ann Thompson and Tana Weingartner joined Brian Yocono for Good Morning, TriState. If you missed the initial segments, check them out now.

WCPO and WVXU explore Cincinnati's biggest untapped resource - water:

Ann Thompson / WVXU

With Thursday's ribbon-cutting ceremony at the new UV Disinfection Treatment Facility, Cincinnati will lead North America in water treatment. It will be the first to use UV disinfection following sand filtration and Granular Activated Carbon during the treatment process.

UV light, generated when reactors excite mercury, is one of the final steps in the water treatment process in Cincinnati. Here are the others, in this order:

WCPO

More than 780 million people worldwide lack access to clean drinking water and 2.6 billion don't have access to proper sanitation. For local water technology companies those numbers are a call to action and a major business opportunity.

WCPO

Each day people from Lima to Cincinnati get their drinking water from an underground river known as the Great Miami Buried Valley Aquifer. It encompasses about 136 square miles and contains 1.5 trillion gallons of water

In fact, 1.6 million people rely on water from the Great Miami Aquifer, including companies like Procter and Gamble and the region's growing number of breweries.

Richard Dube is Vice President of Brewing and Quality for Christian Moerlein and he knows a thing or two about needing water.

WVXU/Ann Thompson

WVXU/Ann Thompson

Ann Thompson / WVXU

The Greater Cincinnati Water Works (GCWW) will add yet another layer of treatment in October to make your drinking water safer. This technology and others like it are a model for the world and that's why Cincinnati is attempting to become a global leader in the area of water technology.

You might say we have some of the cleanest drinking water around. The Greater Cincinnati Water Works treats it with five key steps:

Ann Thompson / WVXU

By the year 2020 the water industry, including treatment, management and infrastructure, could be worth $1 trillion globally. Cincinnati, armed with experts, new technology, and a reputation as a worldwide water leader, is looking to cash in.