University of Cincinnati

Focus on Technology
2:00 pm
Wed September 17, 2014

Shot could eventually suppress food allergies

Peanut allergies are among the most common food allergies. Other common ones include egg and milk allergies.
Ann Thompson WVXU

It's still five years away from human clinical trials, but at least in mice, a new antibody injection has seemingly suppressed allergic reactions to food.

Read more
Focus on Technology
12:30 pm
Mon September 1, 2014

Getting weight loss down to a science

Dr. Habegger, assistant reasearch professor at UC, illustrates different kinds of weight loss surgeries.
Holly Yurchison WVXU

Note: This originally aired on July 31, 2013.

Scientists are just beginning to learn how the body’s hormones are programmed to melt away fat. More hormones in combination with minor surgery may be the solution for the obese. 


Read more
Web surfing
6:00 am
Mon August 25, 2014

The benefits of web-surfing at work

UC researcher Sung Doo Kim did a study on how web-surfing affects workers and their bosses.
Ann Thompson WVXU

They may not admit it, but plenty of people surf the web while at work. Yes, it can be a time-waster, but if done right and limited to about 10 minutes, University of Cincinnati researcher Sung Doo Kim says it has benefits for both the employee and the company.

Benefits:

Read more
"The Graveyard Book"
1:00 am
Fri August 15, 2014

UC grad adapts Neil Gaiman book into a graphic novel

University of Cincinnati graduate P. Craig Russell is on the phone with our Frank Johnson to talk about his graphic novel adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s novel The Graveyard Book. Volume 1 is out now with volume 2 scheduled for release this fall.

Focus on Technology
2:00 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Mammoths & Mastodons may hold clues for distant relative elephant

Scientists are studying mammoth and mastodon teeth to better understand their ecology and the relationship to elephants.
Ann Thompson WVXU

University of Cincinnati scientists have literally drilled down through the teeth of mammoths and mastodons to discover their habits in what’s believed to be the first study of its kind in the region.

UC paleoecologist Brooke Crowley borrowed some mammoth and mastodon teeth from the Museum Center with hopes of finding out where they lived and what they ate. The specimens, very small amounts of white powder from the teeth, were eventually sent to the University of Illinois for  testing.

The process

Read more

Pages