United Way

According to the U.S. Census Bureau’'s 2012 American Community Survey, the City of Cincinnati has the second highest child poverty rate in the nation, with 53.1% of children living below the poverty line. And people all across our region are facing hard economic times, 18% of the Cincinnati tristate population now lives in poverty. WCPO recently launched a year-long series to explore childhood poverty in our region: the causes, efforts to reduce poverty rates and what day-to-day life is like for those in need.

Jay Hanselman

Cradle Cincinnati is announcing a couple new partnerships in an effort to prevent sleep-related infant deaths.  It is called the “Cribs for Kids” program.  

One of those involves the United Way's 211 line.  It connects people with community resources.  

Hamilton County Commissioner and Cradle Cincinnati co-chairman Todd Portune said it will help get baby cribs to parents who need them.

Jay Hanselman

A Cincinnati Council committee will likely vote in two weeks to double the amount of money the city provides for human services funding.  But it will also change the priorities for how those dollars are spent.  

Right now 54 programs share the city's $1.5 million. It could double to $3 million for the next fiscal year which starts on July 1st.  

The United Way manages the city's human services program, and Sonya Turner with the agency addressed the committee Monday.

Cincinnati Council could be asked to make major changes to the way the city provides money for human services programs.  

That includes increasing the city's contribution to these agencies, but also targeting it toward two specific goals:  reducing joblessness and homelessness.  

The changes would begin with the new fiscal year on July 1st.  

The United Way of Greater Cincinnati administers the human services funding program for the city.

  

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