UC Health


UC Health/Mayfield Brain & Spine

University of Cincinnati researchers are looking deep inside the brain to figure out why some head injury patients recover and others do not.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

When Marilyn Cotter's doctor ordered a stress test after a bout of chest tightness the Delhi Township grandmother had a space-age option, the AlterG treadmill.

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It’'s not easy dealing with chronic pain, and medical professionals often resort to prescribing their patients opiates, which can become addictive and lead to more problems. 

Ann Thompson / WVXU

As opioid abuse skyrockets out of control, University of Cincinnati Health researchers are trying to zero in on fresh alternatives for the estimated 100 million people who suffer from chronic pain.

Principal investigator of a $1.95 million federal grant, Jun-Ming Zhang, MD, is studying the roles of the  nervous system and immune system in preclinical models of back and neuropathic pain.


People in Greater Cincinnati waiting for a heart transplant will no longer have to travel hundreds of miles.  After a nearly ten year hiatus, UC Health is again offering the surgery.  David Waits of Hillsboro received a new heart February 2nd.


As Americans become more health-conscious, more physicians and patients are opening up to a whole-person approach of preventative and curative treatments. Integrative medicine combines conventional Western medicine with complementary therapies such as mindfulness, acupuncture, yoga and healthy eating to treat the person, not the disease.



According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of death and disease in the United States. Cigarette smoking kills more than 480,000 Americans each year.

Close to 800,000 Americans each year suffer a new or recurrent stroke, and while stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States, there are nearly 7 million stroke survivors in the U.S.

  Thanks to high-definition cameras, monitors and advances in communications technology, and driven by a growing shortage of physicians, telehealth is quickly growing in use and popularity. It allows a patient to consult with a healthcare provider remotely instead of traveling to an office or clinic, and the costs involved are usually much less than a traditional office visit. Joining us to look at how telehealth is helping to change the practice of medicine are Dr. Debi Sampsel, chief officer of innovation and entrepreneurship at the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing; Pam Kimmel, director of telehealth for UC Health; and, Megan Gresham, director of corporate communications with Maple Knoll Village.

  There are approximately 14.5 million cancer survivors in the United States. Once their treatment for cancer ends, many of these individuals find it difficult to make the transition to what becomes their new normal, where they must adjust to new feelings, new problems, and different ways of looking at the world. To help these survivors,  a new field of cancer care called cancer survivorship has evolved.



  Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men, with about one man in seven being diagnosed with the disease during his lifetime. Yet most men with prostate cancer don'’t die from it. Here to discuss the causes and treatments for prostate cancer, and the latest in available research, are, with the University of Cincinnati  Cancer Institute, Dr. Sadhna Verma, a UC Health radiologist, and Dr.

Dr. DiPaola / UC Health

Doctors say it is something in the air that's helping infertile couples conceive at West Chester Hospital. Ever since the installation of a high-tech air filtration system the UC Health Center for Reproductive Health has seen a 20% increase in fertility for in vitro fertilization.

Medical Director  Krystene DiPaola, MD, says the national average is 40%. In West Chester it's 60%.