trash

Provided / City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati’s Public Services Department is about to get tough on those residents who put out “improperly prepared” trash for pick-up.

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Cincinnati is a step closer to trashing its current policy of residents only being able to put out one container of garbage for pick-up.  Some have widely criticized the requirement and the city has never really enforced it.  

If Council approves the changes, residents will be able to use additional containers.

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Cincinnati officials will likely amend a controversial policy put in place last fall which limited most households to one container of trash per week. 

Gerald Checco with Public Services said the city is not ready to implement those new waste regulations anyway.  He said his department will be working on amendments.  He made a presentation Monday to city council’s neighborhood committee.

The changes would let some households have more than one container as long as it can be picked up by the city's automated trash trucks.

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Starting today, Cincinnati residents and business owners will notice a change in the way the city collects garbage.

For residents it means using trash carts, which were delivered throughout the spring and summer. Nearly 88,000 carts have been dropped off since the program began in April.

Jay Hanselman

The City of Cincinnati is beginning the second phase of a program to deliver new trash carts to city residents.

Households that have their trash collected on Tuesdays will be getting carts throughout May.

Jay Hanselman

Cincinnati will begin making changes to its garbage collection system starting next week.  

That’s when workers will begin distributing 65-gallon trash carts to about 90,000 residents. That process will take until at least August to complete.  

Provided / City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Council will likely vote next week on an ordinance making major changes to how the city picks up your trash.  Officials have been studying the issue for a couple years.  

Budget Director Lea Erikson is the co-chair of a task force recommending the changes.  She said the plan has several goals.

“To modernize the language, improve safety, create clear and consistent rules, enable new technology, limit excessive trash, resume yard waste collection and decrease cost,” Erikson said.

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Cincinnati Council could be asked later this year to change the way the city collects trash in order to save money. 

Officials essentially want to use more automated equipment and reduce the amount of manual labor needed to pick up garbage. 

City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr. has been requesting such a change in several of his recent budget proposals. 

A task force has been studying the issue for a couple years.