Tim Burke

Democrats and Republicans on the Hamilton County Board of Elections are split over whether to move their headquarters from downtown to the former Mercy Mount Airy Hospital because of the issue of early in-person voting.

The Democrats on the board - Tim Burke and Caleb Faux - say moving to the Kipling road building would make it extremely hard for voters without cars to get to the board, which has one bus line. Many voters would have to take multiple buses to get to Mount Airy, they say.

The Democrats on the Hamilton County Board of Elections have asked the Ohio Secretary of State and Ohio Attorney general to investigate whether county prosecutor Joe Deters voted improperly in the November 2012 election.

Democrats Tim Burke, the board of elections chairman, and board member Caleb Faux asked for the investigation after the two Republicans on the board of elections, Alex Triantafilou and Chip Gerhardt, refused to allow the matter to be discussed at a board of elections meeting.

The chairman of the Hamilton County Board of Elections wants the board to look into whether or not county prosecutor Joe Deters improperly voted in the November 2012 election.

Deters, a Republican whose office has prosecuted voters for illegal voting, voted from his Symmes Township address four months after he and his wife Missy separated and he was living in a downtown condo.

Tim Burke, the Hamilton County Democratic Party chairman and chair of the board of elections, said he will ask that the board look at the matter at a future board meeting.

Yes, Cincinnati has a costly and contentious mayor’s race going on.

Yes, there is a mob of 21 candidates scrambling to win one of nine seats on city council. And, yes, there are plenty of controversial issues, from the streetcar to the parking lease to the city’s woeful pension system, for the candidates to argue about.

And yet, the truth is, there are clear indications that Nov. 5 will see the lowest turnout election in Cincinnati in many a decade. Maybe ever.

And what is the particular tea leaf we can read that would lead us to this conclusion?

Ohio Government Website

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted has broken a tie vote on the Hamilton County Board of Elections, sending 39 more cases of persons alleged to have voted twice in the 2012 election to the county prosecutor for possible criminal prosecution.

"These cases should be investigated,'' Husted told WVXU. "It does not necessarily mean people will be indicted and prosecuted. But the elections system does not have the capability to investigate all of these; and the county prosecutor does."

So far, during the months of investigation into alleged voter fraud in the 2012 election, the two Republicans and two Democrats on the Hamilton County Board of Elections have, for the most part, played nice, with partisan bickering down to a minimum.

That could change very quickly Wednesday morning, when the board of elections next meets.

That’s when the board will take up the issue of whether to refer more cases of alleged “voter  anomalies” – that is the polite word they have been using for cases of alleged voter fraud – to the Hamilton County prosecutor.

Democrat David Mann - a former Cincinnati mayor and congressman whose name hasn't been on the ballot since 1994 - is seriously considering a political comeback this year as a candidate for Cincinnati City Council.

"I've described myself as a recovering politician all these years; and maybe I am not,'' said Mann, with a laugh.

The 73-year-old lawyer told WVXU Wednesday that he still has "a passion for public service, which I think is a great privilege. And I think I have something to offer."

Mann said he will make a final decision "very soon."

Anna Louise Inn attorney Tim Burke says the Historic Conservation Board voted unanimously this afternoon to approve the Inn as a conditional use. He said the use will not change.

The request is the latest plan to allow renovation for the 103 year old building. Months ago Western and Southern filed suit blocking any fix up. The company offered to buy the Lytle Park building and wants to turn it into luxury condominiums.

The historic downtown building houses low-income women.

Attorneys for the Anna Louise Inn will go before the Cincinnati Historic Conservation Board this afternoon for a second time. The board issued a favorable report last week. The 103 year old building housing low-income women is in need of renovation and attorney Tim Burke is trying a new tactic.

"Now we're asking the city to approve the entire Anna Louise Inn as a conditional use or a special assistance shelter but the uses won't change."