Thane Maynard

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The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden’s 2018 Barrows Conservation Lecture Series begins March 7. Since 1993, the zoo has invited naturalists and scientists to speak on wildlife issues and global conservation efforts. As a preview of this year's series, Cincinnati Zoo Director Thane Maynard recently talked with each of this year's speakers. For information and tickets to the 2018 Barrows Conservation Lecture Series, click here

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When he retired from his position as senior paleontologist at the Natural History Museum in London, award-winning scientist Richard Fortey purchased four acres of ancient woodland in the Chiltern Hills of Oxfordshire, England. His latest book, "The Wood for the Trees: One Man's Long View of Nature," is the joyful portrait of what he found there. He spoke with Cincinnati Zoo Director Thane Maynard about the wonders of nature to be discovered close to home, if you just look for them. 

Goualougo Triangle Ape Project

Dr. David Morgan is co-director of the Goualougo Triangle Ape Project, a research program to monitor and document great ape health and behavior and examine ape population dynamics within the changing conservation landscape of the Congo Basin. He is also a Research Fellow with the Lester E.

Mutinda Wildlife Education Center

Ken Muithya Mutinda works with the Mutinda Wildlife Education Center in Kenya, which is funded in large part by the Rotary Club of Troy, Ohio. The center provides educational programs for youth and visitors about wildlife and nature conservation. Ken Muithya discussed his work with the Cincinnati Zoo’s Thane Maynard.

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Cincinnati Zoo Director Thane Maynard is tired of 'doom and gloom' stories about nature. He's dedicating himself to focusing on optimistic ones in 2018 on his show The 90-Second Naturalist.

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The Yellowstone population of grizzly bears was designated as an endangered species in 1975, but this June, the Department of the Interior announced the bears would be removed from the Endangered Species List. 

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For 13 years, writer and artist Julie Zickefoose has been drawing, painting and writing about wild birds from her 80 acre sanctuary in Appalachian Ohio. 

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In his latest book, "Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst," Robert Morris Sapolsky explores why we do the things we do. The neuro-endocrinologist is currently a professor of biology, neurology and neurological sciences at Stanford

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Terry Tempest Williams is an American author, naturalist, and conservationist. With more than a dozen books published, Williams has been called "a citizen writer," who speaks, and speaks out, eloquently on behalf of an ethical stance toward life. She recently talked with Cincinnati Zoo Director Thane Maynard about her work and writing. 

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Dr. Roland Kays is renowned for his research on animal movement, using the latest technology to determine patterns of species as small as bats. He is the head of the Biodiversity Lab at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Science and a Research Professor in the Fisheries, Wildlife & Conservation Program at NC State University. He has also published “Candid Creatures: How Camera Traps Reveal the Mysteries of Nature,” the first major book to reveal the secret lives of animals through motion-sensitive game cameras. 

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Dr. Robin Ganzert is the president and CEO of the American Humane Association, which works to protect animals and children from abuse and harm. She also serves as Vice Chair of the Board of Directors for the ALS Association, and on the advisory board for the Mary J. Blige and Steve Stoute Foundation for the Advancement of Women Now.

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Lydia Millet is a bestselling novelist, an op-ed writer for the New York Times and a staff writer for the Center for Biological Diversity. She joins the Cincinnati Zoo's Thane Maynard to discuss the work of the Center and the impact of her environmental opinion pieces in the New York Times.

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One-time Cincinnati Post photographer Robert Clark is now an acclaimed freelance photographer who often goes on assignment for National Geographic

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Richard Conniff is a writer and speaker on human and animal behavior, author of several books including “House of Lost Worlds,” "Natural History of the Rich,” and “The Species Seekers.” 

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Journalist and author Wendy Williams has had a lifelong love affair with horses and has focused her new book on the unique and centuries-old relationship between man and horse.

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This year marks the 25th Annual Barrows Lecture Series at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden. Since 1993, the zoo has invited naturalists and scientists to speak on wildlife issues and global conservation efforts. 

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Public television fans will recognize marine biologist Dr. Carl Safina from his series “Saving the Ocean” which took viewers around the globe in search of good news about ocean life. 

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Gaia Vince is the former editor at Nature magazine who decided to leave her office and travel the world to see how people on the frontline of our changing environment are living. 

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Nearly 100,000 people subscribe to the Gross Science from NOVA channel on YouTube so they can watch host Anna Rothschild explain the slimy, smelly, creepy-crawly world of science and nature in a fun, engaging way. 

Dr. George Uetz is a professor of biology at the University of Cincinnati and Alex Sweger is a graduate student and together they have discovered a new species of wolf spider with audible mating songs that sound a lot like a cat purr. Last summer they presented their findings to the Acoustical Society of America. They sat down with Cincinnati Zoo Director Thane Maynard to talk about wolf spiders and their mating songs.

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Dr. John Kricher is longtime professor of biology at Wheaton College who teaches courses in ecology, ornithology, and vertebrate evolution.

This interview originally aired April 16, 2015.

  Jon Cohen is a correspondent with Science magazine and author of several books, including Almost Chimpanzee: Searching for What Makes Us Human, In Rainforests, Labs, Sanctuaries, and Zoos. He spoke recently with Thane Maynard from the Cincinnati Zoo about his interest in wildlife and his recent article called Zoo Futures.

Noel Rowe grew up in Cincinnati, worked at the Cincinnati Zoo as a young man, and his family has a long history of supporting the local environment – in fact, Rowe Woods at the Cincinnati Nature Center is named after his grandfather. 

The chef at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden, David Miller, is committed to bringing healthier options to the variety of food operations at the zoo, including the concession stands and catering.

  Dr. Linda Bender is a veterinarian, but much more than that. She is a passionate advocate for animals and author of “Animal Wisdom: Learning from the Spiritual Lives of Animals”, which illuminates the undeniable ability for animals to restore our ecological, emotional and spiritual balance. Dr. Bender recently spoke with Thane Maynard from the Cincinnati Zoo.

  After spending 20 years as a research biologist with the Florida Marine Research Institute, Dr. Blair Witherington joined the University of Florida'’s Archie Carr Center for Sea Turtle Research where he is in charge of the Disney Animal Kingdom’'s sea turtle conservation effort.

  In 1964, Clyde Peeling opened Reptiland in Allenwood, Pennsylvania and for the last 50 years, has been educating generations of visitors about the importance of reptiles in nature. Thane Maynard of the Cincinnati Zoo recently had the chance to talk with Clyde Peeling about his half-century at Reptiland.

  Do you remember when you were growing up, playing in creeks and walking through the woods? Have you ever shared some of those experiences with your children?

  

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