same-sex marriage

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

When President Obama delivers his final State of the Union address Tuesday Cincinnatian Jim Obergefell will be watching from the First Lady's reserved section.

The LBGT activist and lead plaintiff  in the U.S. Supreme Court same-sex marriage case says he was first invited by Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley but then Merkley's office called back to say the First Lady wanted Obergefell to be her guest.

Appeals Court Denies Rowan County Request To Not Issue Marriage Licenses

Aug 27, 2015
Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Update 10:00 a.m.: Davis' office is still refusing to issue marriage licenses. A couple was turned away by office staff Thursday morning, according to the Associated Press.

Original Post: Rowan County, KY Clerk Kim Davis will have to resume issuing marriage licenses while she is being sued by four couples who were denied licenses, according to a ruling Wednesday from the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals.

Judge Puts A Deadline On Rowan County Clerk

Aug 19, 2015

A federal judge says Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis will have to resume issuing marriage licenses on August 31st unless an appeals court says otherwise according to Kentucky Public Radio Capitol Reporter Ryland Barton.

U.S. District Judge David Bunning ruled last week that Davis had to resume issuing marriage licenses, but Davis immediately requested a stay of the decision while she appealed the case to the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals.
 

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

U.S. District Court Judge David Bunning in Covington, Kentucky says he will rule no earlier than the week of August 11, 2015 in a case involving whether Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis must issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples despite her religious beliefs.

20th Century Fox has bought movie rights about how Over-the-Rhine resident Jim Obergefell and  Cincinnati attorney Al Gerhardstein won the Supreme Court ruling for same-sex marriage last month.

The New York Times says the studio also obtained film rights to “21 Years to Midnight,” the book Obergefell and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Debbie Cenziper plan to write about Obergefell’s relationship with John Arthur, his partner of more than 20 years. The two married in 2013 in Maryland, where same-sex marriage was legal, when Arthur was in the final stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease. He died later that year.

Wyck Godfrey and Marty Bowen – both producers on the “Twilight” movies and “The Fault in our Stars” – will produce the film, according to wire reports.

Ann Thompson

Following the U.S. Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriage, states are now in the process of studying statutes related to gender specific language that the high court did not specifically order be changed.

One of the gray areas, according to family law attorney Ellen Essig is sperm donation. She says in Ohio, "Our statute on sperm donation speaks to husband and wife and who is a parent when a woman becomes pregnant using donated sperm."

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the impact the U.S. Supreme Court's decision on same-sex marriages could have on elections at the state and national levels. 

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

After years of legal limbo for same-sex couples in four states including Ohio and Kentucky, the U.S. Supreme Court has reversed an appeals court decision, deciding that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Attorneys for two of the plaintiffs in Ohio's same-sex marriage court battle are officially asking the U.S. Supreme Court to take up the issue.

Last week, a 6th Circuit appeals panel upheld lower court rulings related to same-sex marriage bans in Ohio and three other states.

Attorney Al Gerhardstein argues there's now sufficient cause for the high court to hear the case despite its decision not to hear a gay marriage ban case earlier this year..

Tana Weingartner / Instagram.com/917WVXU

Cincinnati's domestic partner registry is officially taking names.

It's designed to give unmarried couples a legal record of their relationship, making it easier for others, like employers or hospitals, to grant benefits and privileges typically available only to families or married couples.

Councilmember Chris Seelbach spearheaded the project and says it's a "very simple way to hopefully help more people be recognized as couples in the City of Cincinnati and in turn leverage health care for one another through their private employer."

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Several hundred people rallied in Lytle Park Tuesday evening, a day before same-sex marriage cases from four states are set to be heard in the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals.

Kim Franklin and Tammy Boyd are parties in the case from Kentucky. Franklin says she and Boyd live every day as a married couple (they were married in Connecticut in 2010) and they want their marriage to be recognized.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Six Cincinnati same-sex couples have filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against The Director of the Ohio Department of Health and the Director of the Hamilton County Probate Court .

The suit seeks to "secure for same-sex couples across Ohio the right to marry on an equal basis with opposite-sex couples."

The Plaintiffs are Michelle Gibson and Deborah Meem; Heather Apple and Mary Koehler; Ronald Kastner Beck and Dave Beck; Andrew Hickman and Ethan Fletcher; Gary Goodman and Karl Rece, Jr.; and Rhonda Craig and Kendra Dukes.

U.S. Government

Federal Judge Timothy Black  has decided Ohio's same sex marriage recognition ban will remain in place while his decision is being appealed. (meaning same-sex couples cannot go to other states, get married and have those marriages recognized in Ohio during the appeal of this case) The exception is the four couples who sued. Their marriages will be recognized and their names will go on the birth certificates of their children.

From Judge Timothy Black's decision

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Monday is the day Federal Judge Timothy Black says he will rule in the case of four same-sex couples who want to get their names on their children's birth certificates.

Their request goes beyond what attorney Al Gerhardstein had originally asked in the February lawsuit. He broadened it to request the judge strike down a portion of Ohio's gay marriage ban, passed by voters in 2004.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Update: Federal Judge Timothy Black says he will issue a ruling by April 14 striking down a portion of Ohio's gay marriage ban passed by voters in 2004. Attorney Al Gerhardstein, representing plaintiffs in a lawsuit about birth certificates, amended his request to ask Black to declare all aspects of Ohio's gay marriage ban unconstitutional. (except the part about getting married in Ohio, because his clients were already married) In federal court Friday morning, the judge said he would do that.

  Some legal experts say the country is entering a new phase in the battle over same-sex marriage, and that fight is taking place in various forms in the tri-state.

By an eight-to-one margin, Ohio voters support the use of medical marijuana, while support for same sex marriage has reached 50 percent, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released this morning.

The poll by the Connecticut-based polling institute, which regularly polls voters in key states, said that 51 percent of Ohio voters said adults should be allowed to possess small amounts of marijuana for personal use, while 44 percent were opposed.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

A lawsuit filed Monday in Cincinnati seeks a federal court order requiring Ohio to put the names of both people in same-sex marriages on the birth certificates of their children.

The plaintiffs include three lesbian couples who were married in other states where same-sex marriage is legal. All live in Greater Cincinnati. One of the women in each marriage is pregnant through artificial insemination. The babies will be born in Cincinnati hospitals in the next few months.

They are represented by attorney Al Gerhardstein.

Indiana House of Representatives

Indiana lawmakers in the Republican-led House Tuesday passed the gay marriage amendment after removing language that would ban recognition of anything “similar” to same-sex marriage.     That change would also lengthen the process of amending the state constitution, but the clause could be reinserted by Senate Republicans.

Measure sponsor Rep. Eric Turner disputes claims by opponents that the ban would hurt economic development. "In 2013, eight of the top nine states with the highest rate of private sector job growth had constitutional amendments on marriage."

It is widely believed that, in 2004, George W. Bush won a second term in the White House because Ohio had a constitutional amendment on the ballot banning same-sex marriage.

The electoral college contest between Bush and Democrat John Kerry, came down to Ohio. Ohio’s constitutional ban on same-sex marriage brought out evangelical Christian voters in droves – the so-called “values voters.”

Holly Yurchison / WVXU

  A Federal Judge in Cincinnati issued a temporary restraining order which will allow a Cincinnati gay couple who were married in Maryland to have their marriage recognized in Ohio. Maryanne Zeleznik talks with the couple’s attorney, Al Gehardstein, about  what the case could mean for other gay couples in the state.

Holly Yurchison / WVXU

Update: Judge Black has granted the temporary restraining order. This means Ohio is now prohibited, in the event of Arthur's death, from issuing a death certificate that doesn't indicate that he was married and name his spouse.

Baltimore Sun

Update: U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Black has scheduled a hearing Monday at 1:30 for this case. Attorneys for Jim Obergefell and John Arthur and attorneys from the Ohio Attorney General's Office will present their case.