same-sex marriage

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

U.S. District Court Judge David Bunning in Covington, Kentucky says he will rule no earlier than the week of August 11, 2015 in a case involving whether Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis must issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples despite her religious beliefs.

20th Century Fox has bought movie rights about how Over-the-Rhine resident Jim Obergefell and  Cincinnati attorney Al Gerhardstein won the Supreme Court ruling for same-sex marriage last month.

The New York Times says the studio also obtained film rights to “21 Years to Midnight,” the book Obergefell and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Debbie Cenziper plan to write about Obergefell’s relationship with John Arthur, his partner of more than 20 years. The two married in 2013 in Maryland, where same-sex marriage was legal, when Arthur was in the final stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease. He died later that year.

Wyck Godfrey and Marty Bowen – both producers on the “Twilight” movies and “The Fault in our Stars” – will produce the film, according to wire reports.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the impact the U.S. Supreme Court's decision on same-sex marriages could have on elections at the state and national levels. 

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

After years of legal limbo for same-sex couples in four states including Ohio and Kentucky, the U.S. Supreme Court has reversed an appeals court decision, deciding that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Attorneys for two of the plaintiffs in Ohio's same-sex marriage court battle are officially asking the U.S. Supreme Court to take up the issue.

Last week, a 6th Circuit appeals panel upheld lower court rulings related to same-sex marriage bans in Ohio and three other states.

Attorney Al Gerhardstein argues there's now sufficient cause for the high court to hear the case despite its decision not to hear a gay marriage ban case earlier this year..

Tana Weingartner / Instagram.com/917WVXU

Cincinnati's domestic partner registry is officially taking names.

It's designed to give unmarried couples a legal record of their relationship, making it easier for others, like employers or hospitals, to grant benefits and privileges typically available only to families or married couples.

Councilmember Chris Seelbach spearheaded the project and says it's a "very simple way to hopefully help more people be recognized as couples in the City of Cincinnati and in turn leverage health care for one another through their private employer."

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Several hundred people rallied in Lytle Park Tuesday evening, a day before same-sex marriage cases from four states are set to be heard in the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals.

Kim Franklin and Tammy Boyd are parties in the case from Kentucky. Franklin says she and Boyd live every day as a married couple (they were married in Connecticut in 2010) and they want their marriage to be recognized.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Six Cincinnati same-sex couples have filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against The Director of the Ohio Department of Health and the Director of the Hamilton County Probate Court .

The suit seeks to "secure for same-sex couples across Ohio the right to marry on an equal basis with opposite-sex couples."

The Plaintiffs are Michelle Gibson and Deborah Meem; Heather Apple and Mary Koehler; Ronald Kastner Beck and Dave Beck; Andrew Hickman and Ethan Fletcher; Gary Goodman and Karl Rece, Jr.; and Rhonda Craig and Kendra Dukes.

U.S. Government

Federal Judge Timothy Black  has decided Ohio's same sex marriage recognition ban will remain in place while his decision is being appealed. (meaning same-sex couples cannot go to other states, get married and have those marriages recognized in Ohio during the appeal of this case) The exception is the four couples who sued. Their marriages will be recognized and their names will go on the birth certificates of their children.

From Judge Timothy Black's decision

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Monday is the day Federal Judge Timothy Black says he will rule in the case of four same-sex couples who want to get their names on their children's birth certificates.

Their request goes beyond what attorney Al Gerhardstein had originally asked in the February lawsuit. He broadened it to request the judge strike down a portion of Ohio's gay marriage ban, passed by voters in 2004.

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