Roxanne Qualls

Jay Hanselman

Workers at Cincinnati City Hall are getting ready for a new mayor and council to take office Sunday.

The Cincinnati Council session Tuesday was the last for Mayor Mark Mallory, City Manager Milton Dohoney and Council members Roxanne Qualls, Laure Quinlivan and Pam Thomas.  Much of the meeting was devoted to goodbyes for each.

Mallory could not seek re-election this year because of term limits.  He spoke about his time in office.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Clearly, the majority of Cincinnati voters who went to the polls Tuesday were determined to shake up Cincinnati City Hall, electing John Cranley as their new mayor and changing the face of the nine-member city council.

Cranley, a 39-year-old Hyde Park resident who grew up in Price Hill and a former council member, easily defeated a fellow Democrat who has been one of the top vote-getters in the Queen City over the past three decades, Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls.

In the unofficial vote count, Cranley took 58 percent to Qualls’ 42 percent.

Michael Keating

WVXU political reporter, Howard Wilkinson talks about tomorrow's election and the last 24 hours of campaigning in the Cincinnati Mayor's race.

Say what you want about Mark Mallory’s eight years as mayor of Cincinnati, which are rapidly coming to a close.

You can love him; you can loathe him.

What you can’t do is ignore him.

The man is a showman. Part stand-up comic. Your genial host. The man of a thousand quips.

And, if you find yourself on the wrong side of an issue he supports, a bulldog, who fights and claws and cajoles until he gets what he wants. A mini-LBJ. A chip off the ol’ block – his father, William Mallory Sr., a leader in the Ohio House for decades, was the same way.

It’s official now.

The 2013 Cincinnati mayoral race between Democrats Roxanne Qualls and John Cranley will be the most expensive since the city began direct election of the mayor in 2001.

That’s not much history to go on, but a record is a record.

Campaign finance reports filed this week showed that Cranley, a former city council member, had raised $909,775 through the Oct. 16 cut-off date, while Qualls had raised $640,000.

Candidates for public office collect endorsements from groups and influential individuals the way that sports memorabilia enthusiasts collect autographed rookie baseball cards of Hall of Famers.

They hoard them.

And then they use them, for whatever they are worth, to get elected.

Cincinnati’s mayoral candidates, Roxanne Qualls and John Cranley have put together quite a collection.

Provided / Commissioner Greg Hartmann's office.

Cincinnati's Union Terminal is in need of major repairs but Hamilton County Commissioner Greg Hartmann says the Museum Center is going to have to find a way to lower the price tag.

Hartmann says the current $180 million estimate is too high.

With less than a month left to persuade voters, Roxanne Qualls and John Cranley are each making their final push to become Cincinnati’s next mayor. We hear what each candidate has to say, on the streetcar, parking lease plan, balancing the city’s budget, and other issues that will determine the outcome of this election.

Jay Hanselman

Roxanne Qualls says if she's elected Cincinnati mayor in the November election, she'll select Council Member Wendell Young to be her Vice Mayor.

Qualls made the announcement Monday during a press conference on the sidewalk outside the Hamilton County Board of Elections

“He is someone who has shown, since he’s been on City Council, tremendous judgment, maturity, and leadership as well as a clear ability to work with the other members of Council to forge coalitions and also to be very collaborative,” Qualls said.

John Cranley and Roxanne Qualls, the two candidates for Cincinnati mayor, will meet in a community forum at noon next Thursday at Christ Church Cathedral downtown.

Organizers of the Community Issues Forum, a long-standing noontime tradition at Christ Church Cathedral, are not calling the joint appearance of the two Democrats a debate.

At the forum, each candidate will be given an allotted period of time to lay out his or her vision for the city and plans if he or she is elected mayor on Nov. 5. Then, the candidates will take questions from the audience.