Richard Cordray

The candidates for governor appear to have different approaches on how they’d pay for infrastructure, with construction costs going up and gas tax revenue declining.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked Monday morning with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik about the Ohio governor's race between Democrat Richard Cordray and Republican Mike DeWine and how close a race it is likely to be - despite DeWine's money advantage. 

A new statewide poll shows the Ohio governor’s race is a tie right now. 

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Democratic gubernatorial candidate Rich Cordray brought his campaign to Cincinnati and Springfield Monday. In Hamilton County, he met with healthcare professionals and largely focused on reducing infant mortality.

Democratic nominee for Ohio governor Richard Cordray visited a manufacturing site in Cleveland on Tuesday and talked about his small business plans.  

Cordray met with business leaders for a closed-to-press session at Magnet, a manufacturing incubator that receives state and federal funding.

The former federal consumer protection chief then toured the facility on the eastern edge of downtown. Founders of some of Magnet’s startups showed off their products. Cordray handled lightweight “smart mulch,” inspected adaptive clothing for seniors and sampled Cleveland Whiskey.

Democratic candidate for governor Richard Cordray says his Republican opponent Mike DeWine has failed to adequately address the opioid crisis as the state's Attorney General.

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This is how it usually works in a gubernatorial or U.S. Senate election in Ohio:

The candidate for governor or U.S. senator who racks up a huge margin of victory usually helps lift up the down-ticket statewide candidates of his party (and I do mean his, since neither the Republicans nor Democrats in Ohio have seen fit yet to nominate a woman for one of those offices).

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the disagreements between Ohio Gov.  John Kasich and GOP gubernatorial candidate Mike DeWine over two of Kasich's signature issues - JobsOhio and Medicaid expansion. Will the differences mean Kasich doesn't help DeWine in the fall campaign? 

cincinnati edition
Jim Nolan / WVXU

Ohio gubernatorial candidates Republican Mike DeWine and Democrat Richard Cordray win their party's primaries and prepare to face-off in the November general election. Ohio voters pass Issue 1, the proposal to end gerrymandering in the state, by a wide margin. Large donations to area churches from the foundation directed by Cincinnati City Councilman Jeff Pastor around the time of last November's election raise questions. And how a possible fare increase by Metro could leave many regular bus riders stranded at the curb.

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Andy Chow / Ohio Statehouse News Bureau

Democratic Senator Sherrod Brown says he is not surprised or worried about the lower Democratic voter turnout during yesterday's primary election.

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Game on.

The field is set for this fall's Ohio gubernatorial race, with the Associated Press calling both the Democratic and Republican races early in the evening.

Early voting wraps up Monday afternoon at 2 p.m. at boards of elections throughout the state. According to the Ohio Secretary of State’s office, the number of early ballots requested and cast is surging over 2014’s primary. 

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson told News Director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning that, while the Ohio governor's race is the big ticket item on Tuesday's primary election ballot, there are many ballot issues to draw voters to the polls. A look at where things stand less than 24 hours before the polls open in Ohio. 

Less than a week before Election Day, four in 10 Democratic voters remain uncertain who they want to be their nominee for governor. Here's more on the latest Baldwin Wallace poll on the statewide primary election.

The poll shows nearly a third of likely Democratic primary voters think Richard Cordray, the former head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau should be their nominee. Fifteen percent pick former Congressman Dennis Kucinich.

Which Ohio Candidates Will Take All May 8?

May 3, 2018
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Ohio Republican and Democratic voters will choose their party's candidates for governor in the May 8 primary elections next week. The winners in the primary races will run in November to replace Governor John Kasich, who is term-limited.

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Next Tuesday's race for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination between Richard Cordray and Dennis Kucinich has the potential to keep a lot of Ohio Democrats up until the wee hours next Wednesday morning.

Depending on who you talk to, it's either going to be an incredibly close race, or it will be a relatively easy win for Cordray, the former Ohio attorney general who spent the past seven years as head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in Washington.

But with one major poll suggesting that, as of mid-April, more than half of the likely Democratic primary voters were undecided, you can throw all predictions out the window.

They mean nothing.

The Democratic and Republican candidates for governor have filed their final fundraising reports before the May primary. And there’s a clear winner in the money race.

Dennis Kucinich
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Editor's note: Faithful readers of Howard Wilkinson's weekly "Politically Speaking" column will want to know that this feature will be published on Wednesdays beginning May 1. 

OK, Ohio gubernatorial candidate Dennis Kucinich, you may have your hands full explaining this to Democratic primary voters.

You've reported receiving $20,000 for a speech last year from the Association for Investment in Popular Action Committees.

That would be a group which clearly is sympathetic to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, as it is the parent organization of the pro-Assad Syrian Solidarity Movement.

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Former congressman and Cleveland Mayor Dennis Kucinich picked up a major endorsement Sunday from the Plain Dealer newspaper and cleveland.com. Kucinich has some establishment Democrats worried he might win the Democratic gubernatorial primary. They think former Attorney General Richard Cordray would be a stronger candidate against Mike DeWine, the likely Republican candidate for governor. 

The Democratic primary for governor in Ohio could well boil down to where the candidates stand and what kind of record they have on gun control.

It's reasonable to believe  the vast majority of Democratic primary voters, in the wake of cold-blooded murder of 17 students and faculty members at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, are enraged over the easy access to semi-automatic weapons and are solidly behind the nationwide movement of high school students marching and lobbying for gun control.

Appearing with Mayor Andrew Ginther in Columbus on Monday, Richard Cordray announced his plan to combat the opioid epidemic in Ohio.

WLWT-TV news anchor Sheree Paolello will moderate a debate by Democratic governor candidates broadcast live by the station at 7 p.m. April 10.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday about Ohio Supreme Court Justice Bill O'Neill and his declared candidacy for Ohio governor. Can O'Neill continue to sit on the bench and be a partisan political candidate? Many are saying no, but O'Neill, the only Democrat on the court, says he won't resign until Jan. 26. 

Until recently former Ohio attorney general Richard Cordray had been stuck in political limbo for what seemed like an eternity, unable, by federal law, to even hint at his ambition to be Ohio's next governor.

The Grove City Democrat was serving as the first director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), with a six-year term that was to have expired in June 2018.

The Hatch Act, which prohibits most federal employees from engaging in partisan politics, kept Cordray quiet about his ambitions, even though everyone in Ohio knew he had them burning inside him.

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Soccer dominated local news this week. Or, more accurately, how to finance the game, as both Cincinnati City Council and Hamilton County Commissioners approved funding measures totaling approximately $52 million towards a parking garage and other infrastructure for a new FC Cincinnati stadium. The team is one of four finalists vying for a Major League Soccer franchise, and will present their proposal to MLS next week.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about all the news generated by Ohio Democrats last week: Former Ohio Attorney General Rich Cordray announcing he will quit his federal job, presumably to run for Ohio governor; and a bizarre Facebook post from Ohio Supreme Court Justice Bill O'Neill in which he detailed his sex life, creating a firestorm of criticism from fellow Democrats. 

It was becoming something like a Samuel Beckett play: Waiting for Cordray.

Nearly a year of waiting for Richard Cordray, the former state treasurer and Ohio attorney general, to make up his mind to leave as the first and only director the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), ended Wednesday when Cordray sent a letter to his staff saying he would leave office by the end of the month.

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Richard Cordray says he will step down from his post as head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, signaling a possible run for Ohio Governor. Hamilton County Commission rejects FC Cincinnati's stadium plan just weeks before Major League Soccer owners decide which new teams to allow into the league. And a recount shows activist investor Nelson Peltz won his proxy fight with Procter and Gamble.

We've sort of become accustomed to candidates meeting in debates and spending as much time ripping into each other as they do talking about their own ideas.

This was not the case last Tuesday night, when the four Democrats running for Ohio governor met on a high school auditorium stage last Tuesday night in Martins Ferry, an Ohio River town in Belmont County.

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The Ohio Democratic Party is waiting to see if either Richard Cordray or Jerry Springer will enter the race for governor. A study finds the Hamilton County Land Reutilization Corporation has not properly maintained many of the 700 properties it owns.

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