Richard Cordray

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Former congressman and Cleveland Mayor Dennis Kucinich picked up a major endorsement Sunday from the Plain Dealer newspaper and cleveland.com. Kucinich has some establishment Democrats worried he might win the Democratic gubernatorial primary. They think former Attorney General Richard Cordray would be a stronger candidate against Mike DeWine, the likely Republican candidate for governor. 

The Democratic primary for governor in Ohio could well boil down to where the candidates stand and what kind of record they have on gun control.

It's reasonable to believe  the vast majority of Democratic primary voters, in the wake of cold-blooded murder of 17 students and faculty members at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, are enraged over the easy access to semi-automatic weapons and are solidly behind the nationwide movement of high school students marching and lobbying for gun control.

Appearing with Mayor Andrew Ginther in Columbus on Monday, Richard Cordray announced his plan to combat the opioid epidemic in Ohio.

WLWT-TV news anchor Sheree Paolello will moderate a debate by Democratic governor candidates broadcast live by the station at 7 p.m. April 10.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday about Ohio Supreme Court Justice Bill O'Neill and his declared candidacy for Ohio governor. Can O'Neill continue to sit on the bench and be a partisan political candidate? Many are saying no, but O'Neill, the only Democrat on the court, says he won't resign until Jan. 26. 

Until recently former Ohio attorney general Richard Cordray had been stuck in political limbo for what seemed like an eternity, unable, by federal law, to even hint at his ambition to be Ohio's next governor.

The Grove City Democrat was serving as the first director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), with a six-year term that was to have expired in June 2018.

The Hatch Act, which prohibits most federal employees from engaging in partisan politics, kept Cordray quiet about his ambitions, even though everyone in Ohio knew he had them burning inside him.

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Soccer dominated local news this week. Or, more accurately, how to finance the game, as both Cincinnati City Council and Hamilton County Commissioners approved funding measures totaling approximately $52 million towards a parking garage and other infrastructure for a new FC Cincinnati stadium. The team is one of four finalists vying for a Major League Soccer franchise, and will present their proposal to MLS next week.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about all the news generated by Ohio Democrats last week: Former Ohio Attorney General Rich Cordray announcing he will quit his federal job, presumably to run for Ohio governor; and a bizarre Facebook post from Ohio Supreme Court Justice Bill O'Neill in which he detailed his sex life, creating a firestorm of criticism from fellow Democrats. 

It was becoming something like a Samuel Beckett play: Waiting for Cordray.

Nearly a year of waiting for Richard Cordray, the former state treasurer and Ohio attorney general, to make up his mind to leave as the first and only director the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), ended Wednesday when Cordray sent a letter to his staff saying he would leave office by the end of the month.

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Richard Cordray says he will step down from his post as head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, signaling a possible run for Ohio Governor. Hamilton County Commission rejects FC Cincinnati's stadium plan just weeks before Major League Soccer owners decide which new teams to allow into the league. And a recount shows activist investor Nelson Peltz won his proxy fight with Procter and Gamble.

We've sort of become accustomed to candidates meeting in debates and spending as much time ripping into each other as they do talking about their own ideas.

This was not the case last Tuesday night, when the four Democrats running for Ohio governor met on a high school auditorium stage last Tuesday night in Martins Ferry, an Ohio River town in Belmont County.

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The Ohio Democratic Party is waiting to see if either Richard Cordray or Jerry Springer will enter the race for governor. A study finds the Hamilton County Land Reutilization Corporation has not properly maintained many of the 700 properties it owns.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked Monday morning with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik about what the possible entry of Democrat Richard Cordray could mean to an already crowded field; and why this race to replace lame-duck governor John Kasich is already in full-swing. 

For a guy who refuses to talk about the subject, former Ohio Attorney General Richard Cordray has nearly everybody in Ohio Democratic Party politics expecting him to jump into the 2018 race for governor.

We've always thought Cordray had some extraordinary politics skills, but to create the kind of buzz we have seen in the past week while steadfastly refusing to talk about it is quite a neat trick.

It's not as if the Democrats don't already have some credible candidates for governor in the 2018.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

"Economic rights are civil rights."  That was the theme of Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray's address Tuesday to the NAACP national convention in Cincinnati.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about growing calls for Hillary Clinton to consider former Ohio attorney general and state treasurer Richard Cordray as her running mate. It's a long shot, but Cordray is likely to get consideration. 

Suddenly, there is a major buzz going on – and not just in the Buckeye State – about an Ohioan possibly joining Hillary Clinton on the Democratic ticket as the vice presidential candidate.

You may well have read the above paragraph and assumed we were talking about the senior senator from Ohio, Sherrod Brown, who has been the subject of much veepship speculation.

Well, we're not talking about Sherrod Brown.

Ohio Democrats who were hoping that Richard Cordray, the former state treasurer and attorney general, might rush in on a white horse, with a hardy “Heigh Ho Silver”  and save the day in the 2014 Ohio governor’s race, may as well move along.


There’s nothing to see here.

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Sen. Rob Portman, R-Terrace Park, has been working behind the scenes to clear the way for the renomination of an Ohio Democrat, Richard Cordray, as head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, according to a story in Roll Call, a Capitol Hill newspaper.

Senate Republicans have thus far refused to move on President Obama's renomination of Cordray, a former Ohio treasurer and attorney general, along with a number of other presidential appointments.

Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

A commanding lead among male voters has made Ohio Gov. John Kasich the early favorite for re-election in 2014, according to a Quinnipiac University Poll released Thursday morning.

Michael Keating

This week WVXU Political Reporter Howard Wilkinson talks about the Ohio Governor's race and the changing attitudes on gay marriage, with Maryanne Zeleznik.