retirement

According to new data from Fidelity Investments, the average 401(k) balance hit a record high of $91,300 at the end of last year. Yet roughly one-third of all U.S. families have no money set aside for retirement, Federal Reserve data shows. This includes 19 percent of people aged 55 to 64. Joining us to provide information on 401(k)s and other retirement accounts are financial advisor Chris DeSimio, and from Madison Wealth Management, Managing Principal and Portfolio Manager Ed Kuresman and Principal and Senior Wealth Advisor Joseph Hack.

  Last week, U.S. stocks had their worst one-day drop since February as traders worried about weak corporate earnings and the looming end of economic stimulus from the Federal Reserve. In mid-July, the Dow Jones was over 17,000; by last Friday it had dropped to just under 16,500. We look at the recent volatility in the stock markets, how it affects the average investor, and what those who see their retirement accounts losing value should do.

A Cincinnati Council member said he had a plan to put the city's retirement system on a path of solvency.  Christopher Smitherman introduced his motion Tuesday during a council committee meeting.

One of his proposals is to end the three percent compound cost-of-living adjustments given to most retirees each year.  Smitherman would change that to a simple COLA tied to the consumer price index and not exceeding two percent per year.  Those adjustments would also be suspended for three years if his plan is approved.

Retirement Investing

Nov 6, 2013

  Financial experts recommend you start saving for retirement as soon as you can afford it, ideally with your first paycheck. But few do, and many of us are into our fifties before we realize we need to get serious about saving and investing for what we hope will be our golden years. Foster and Motley Financial Planner David Foster and local Financial Advisor Christ DeSimio shed some light on investing for your retirement.

Jay Hanselman

Cincinnati voters will decide in November if they want to amend the charter to make changes to the city's troubled pension system.  Those could include finding a way to fully fund the current plan in ten years and requiring new employees to be in 401K style plans similar to those offered by many private employers.  

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