Rand Paul

Michael E. Keating

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the two possible GOP presidential contenders from the Tristate - Kentucky's Rand Paul and Ohio's John Kasich. Last week was not a particularly good week for either of them.

So, how about the Tristate’s two potential Republican presidential candidates, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky and Ohio governor John Kasich? What kind of week did -they have, you ask?

Well, not so great. At least as it relates to whatever presidential ambitions they have.

Kasich was the victim of polls in key states that show pretty clearly that, as a potential candidate, he ranks at or near the bottom of the list among GOP voters in some important battleground states; and doesn’t exactly set the world on fire among Ohio Republican voters either.

There’s one thing you can say for certain about the small-government, libertarian-leaning junior senator from Kentucky, Rand Paul, who (presumably) would like to be the next president of the United States.

He doesn’t shy away from a tough crowd.

Paul did it last year when he made a speech before a somewhat less than receptive crowd at Howard University, the historically black college in Washington, D.C.

U.S. Senate office

Rand Paul, Kentucky’s junior senator and a likely contender for the 2016 GOP presidential nomination, pitched his ideas of economic and personal freedom to a polite but small crowd this morning at the National Urban League Conference.

Paul’s early morning speech, which lasted about 17 minutes, was seen as part of his continuing effort to reach out to minority voters, particularly African-Americans, in order to broaden the GOP voter base.

National Urban League

About 8,500 delegates will arrive in Cincinnati Wednesday for the four-day annual conference of the National Urban League.

The event at the Duke Energy Convention Center will feature some well-known speakers – Vice President Joe Biden on Thursday and U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, a potential Republican presidential candidate, on Friday.

The theme of this year’s annual conference is “One Nation Underemployed: Bridges to Jobs and Justice.”

Michael Keating

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked this morning with Maryanne Zeleznik about Sen. Rand Paul stumping in Cincinnati; and Democrat Ed Fitzgerald's chances to defeat Republican incumbent John Kasich in the Ohio governor's race.

Howard Wilkinson

There was no declaration of candidacy for president Friday night when Rand Paul appeared before a large crowd at the Hamilton County Republican Party’s Lincoln-Reagan Day dinner, but he sounded like a man who may well run.

And, before a crowd of over 600 at the Duke Energy Convention Center, the junior senator from Kentucky made it clear that if he does run and becomes the 2016 GOP nominee, he knows who his Democratic opponent will be – former secretary of state Hillary Clinton.

WVXU's politics reporter, Howard Wilkinson, talked with Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the chances of an Ohio or Kentucky candidate being nominated for president if the GOP convention comes to Cincinnati in 2016. And, of course, a little baseball talk on the Reds' Opening Day.

Alright, let’s assume for the moment that Cincinnati does land the 2016 Republican presidential nominating convention.

What would the chances be that the eventual nominee of the GOP turns out to be from Ohio, the host state, or right across the river in Kentucky?

It’s a long shot, but by no means outside the realm of possibility.

Despite having an Electoral College map that works decidedly against them, the Republicans seemingly have more potential 2016 presidential contenders than Heinz has varieties.

Michael E. Keating

WVXU political reporter Howard Wilkinson talks with Maryanne Zeleznik about the chances of the 2016 Republican National Convention coming to Cincinnati, Rand Paul's support in the CPAC straw poll and how Paul will help the local GOP raise money in May.