Rand Paul

Official portrait

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul is suspending his campaign for President. He issued the following statement Wednesday morning:

"It's been an incredible honor to run a principled campaign for the White House. Today, I will end where I began, ready and willing to fight for the cause of Liberty.

Across the country thousands upon thousands of young people flocked to our message of limited government, privacy, criminal justice reform and a reasonable foreign policy. Brushfires of Liberty were ignited, and those will carry on, as will I.  

Howard Wilkinson

Rand Paul, Kentucky’s junior senator, didn’t bring up the subject of his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination when he spoke to the Florence Rotary Club Monday, but he had plenty to say about it to reporters afterwards.

Paul, who is mired in the single digits in national polls, took a back-handed swipe at the Republican candidate who is leading most national polls, business mogul Donald Trump – and he did it without mentioning him by name.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about where things stand with Ohio Gov. John Kasich's bid for the GOP presidential nomination and the Kentucky GOP creating a presidential caucus so GOP presidential contender Rand Paul can be on the primary ballot as a candidate for re-election to the Senate next year. 

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Ann Thompson Monday morning about the seeming rise of John Kasich's presidential ambitions; and the fact that Kentucky's Rand Paul appears to have a campaign stalled in neutral. 

August has not been kind to Rand Paul, Kentucky’s junior senator and one of 17 contenders for the Republican presidential nomination.

In fact, August has been downright rude to Paul.

Not much has gone right for Paul lately.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about Kentucky's Rand Paul and Ohio's John Kasich - specifically, what the polling in the early caucus and primary states of Iowa and New Hampshire have to say about them.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked this morning with news director Maryanne Zeleznik about Hillary Clinton making her candidacy official on Sunday; and how Rand Paul is trying to recover from a bumpy start to his campaign.

Kentucky’s junior senator, Rand Paul, has been off and running (officially) for the Republican presidential nomination for nearly a week now.

He has, in fact, been running for several years, but he made it official last week with his “Stand with Rand” tour through early primary and caucus states – Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina, Nevada.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked this morning with Jay Hanselman about the possibility that both Ohio and Kentucky will have contenders for the GOP presidential nomination - Ohio Gov. John Kasich and Kentucky's Sen. Rand Paul.

Ohio is a quadrennial battleground in presidential elections; and Kentucky – well, Kentucky is not, but they do love their politics in the Commonwealth. Though not as much as they love their basketball.

But the two states separated by the muddy river may both do something they don’t do very often, at least not in the past century: produce bona fide presidential candidates.

They are, of course, the junior U.S. senator from Bowling Green, Ky., Rand Paul; and the native Pennsylvanian-turned-Buckeye who was re-elected governor last fall in a cakewalk, John Kasich.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the boost Rand Paul's presidential ambitions have gotten lately; and how House Speaker John Boehner failed to rally his caucus around a three-week spending plan for the Homeland Security Department.

Michael E. Keating

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the two possible GOP presidential contenders from the Tristate - Kentucky's Rand Paul and Ohio's John Kasich. Last week was not a particularly good week for either of them.

So, how about the Tristate’s two potential Republican presidential candidates, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky and Ohio governor John Kasich? What kind of week did -they have, you ask?

Well, not so great. At least as it relates to whatever presidential ambitions they have.

Kasich was the victim of polls in key states that show pretty clearly that, as a potential candidate, he ranks at or near the bottom of the list among GOP voters in some important battleground states; and doesn’t exactly set the world on fire among Ohio Republican voters either.

There’s one thing you can say for certain about the small-government, libertarian-leaning junior senator from Kentucky, Rand Paul, who (presumably) would like to be the next president of the United States.

He doesn’t shy away from a tough crowd.

Paul did it last year when he made a speech before a somewhat less than receptive crowd at Howard University, the historically black college in Washington, D.C.

U.S. Senate office

Rand Paul, Kentucky’s junior senator and a likely contender for the 2016 GOP presidential nomination, pitched his ideas of economic and personal freedom to a polite but small crowd this morning at the National Urban League Conference.

Paul’s early morning speech, which lasted about 17 minutes, was seen as part of his continuing effort to reach out to minority voters, particularly African-Americans, in order to broaden the GOP voter base.

National Urban League

About 8,500 delegates will arrive in Cincinnati Wednesday for the four-day annual conference of the National Urban League.

The event at the Duke Energy Convention Center will feature some well-known speakers – Vice President Joe Biden on Thursday and U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, a potential Republican presidential candidate, on Friday.

The theme of this year’s annual conference is “One Nation Underemployed: Bridges to Jobs and Justice.”

Michael Keating

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked this morning with Maryanne Zeleznik about Sen. Rand Paul stumping in Cincinnati; and Democrat Ed Fitzgerald's chances to defeat Republican incumbent John Kasich in the Ohio governor's race.

Howard Wilkinson

There was no declaration of candidacy for president Friday night when Rand Paul appeared before a large crowd at the Hamilton County Republican Party’s Lincoln-Reagan Day dinner, but he sounded like a man who may well run.

And, before a crowd of over 600 at the Duke Energy Convention Center, the junior senator from Kentucky made it clear that if he does run and becomes the 2016 GOP nominee, he knows who his Democratic opponent will be – former secretary of state Hillary Clinton.

WVXU's politics reporter, Howard Wilkinson, talked with Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the chances of an Ohio or Kentucky candidate being nominated for president if the GOP convention comes to Cincinnati in 2016. And, of course, a little baseball talk on the Reds' Opening Day.

Alright, let’s assume for the moment that Cincinnati does land the 2016 Republican presidential nominating convention.

What would the chances be that the eventual nominee of the GOP turns out to be from Ohio, the host state, or right across the river in Kentucky?

It’s a long shot, but by no means outside the realm of possibility.

Despite having an Electoral College map that works decidedly against them, the Republicans seemingly have more potential 2016 presidential contenders than Heinz has varieties.

Michael E. Keating

WVXU political reporter Howard Wilkinson talks with Maryanne Zeleznik about the chances of the 2016 Republican National Convention coming to Cincinnati, Rand Paul's support in the CPAC straw poll and how Paul will help the local GOP raise money in May.

U.S. Senate

The Hamilton County Republican Party has landed one of the hottest names in national GOP politics as its speaker at the annual Lincoln-Reagan dinner in May - Rand Paul, Kentucky's junior senator.

Paul, who was elected to the Senate in 2010, is said to be seriously considering a run for the GOP presidential nomination in 2016.

The event will take place on the evening of Friday, May 16, although the county party organization has yet to set the time and place for the Lincoln-Reagan dinner, one of the party's major fundraising events each year.

University of Virginia Center for Politics

    

Ohio has long been a political bell-weather state, and now Kentucky is in the spotlight, with pundits closely watching the race for Mitch McConnell’s senate seat, and the growing prominence of Kentucky’s junior senator, Tea Party favorite Rand Paul. Political Analyst and Creator of Sabato's Crystal Ball, Larry Sabato, discusses Kentucky’s role in national politics.

Continuing the conversation about Kentucky’s role on the national political stage from a local perspective, Political Analyst and Author Rick Robinson and Former Chair of the Kentucky Democratic Party, Nathan Smith, join Howard and Jay to discuss Mitch McConnell’s chances in 2014, and what part Rand Paul could play in the 2016 presidential election.

NPR

  US Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky now faces challenges to his 2014 re-election from both a Democrat and a Tea Party candidate. Political Junkie Ken Rudin joins us to discuss the effort to un-seat the long-serving Republican Senator, and talk about other races that will affect our region, and the country.

Michael Keating

This week Howard Wilkinson talks about Rand Paul's possible presidential bid and expanding gun rights in Ohio. 

Would you like to hear the good news for Kentucky’s junior senator, Rand Paul, or the not-so-good news first?


Well, we don’t want to be accused of dwelling on the unpleasant, so we’ll start with the good news for Paul.


Paul, who rode the tea party wave to a seat in the U.S. Senate in 2010, is the front runner for the GOP presidential nomination in 2016, according to one recent poll.

photo by Michael Keating

This week Howard Wilkinson talks about why there will be a primary election for Cincinnati Mayor and some regional politicians who's names are being mentioned for president in 2016.

The Rand Paul phenomenon seems to have crossed the river into Ohio.


Actually, the popularity of the junior senator from Kentucky has crossed a lot of boundaries in recent months – the point where he is considered by many a legitimate contender for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination.


Before the 2010 election, he was a practicing ophthalmologist, running a clinic down in Bowling Green, Ky. It was his father who was the famous one – then-Texas congressman Ron Paul, who has run three times for president as a Libertarian and a Republican.

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