preservation

Business
2:09 pm
Mon November 3, 2014

Davis Furniture Building: Demolish or save?

The Davis Furniture Building
Credit Bill Rinehart / WVXU

The 157 year old Davis Furniture building at Central Parkway and Main Street, has been vacant for ten years, and since that time, it's been deteriorating.  Scott Stough of the Stough Group says it's an eyesore that his company would like to get rid of.  They've been renovating buildings across the street, and he says the Davis building is depreciating the value.  The Stough Group purchased the four story structure last year and looked into fixing it, but he says it was too costly.  Stough says they looked for historic tax credits along with credits to turn the building residential, or a com

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Neighborhood life
3:05 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Walnut Hills study begins this week

A revitalization study of Cincinnati's Walnut Hills neighborhoods gets underway Tuesday afternoon.  

Margo Warminski with the Cincinnati Preservation Association called it a data driven planning tool.

“It was created in response to the issues in older industrial cities that have lots of population and job loss mostly in the Midwest and East but elsewhere,” Warminski said.  “And as a result they’ve got large inventories of vacant, often decaying, buildings many of which are historic and often they’re torn down without an overall plan.”

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Cincinnati Preservation Association
1:32 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Preserving Modern Architecture in the Midwest

Rauh House

The Cincinnati Preservation Association will host a two-day symposium entitled Preserving Modern Architecture in the Midwest on April 24-25. CPA Executive Director Paul Mueller tells our Stuart Holman that the event will be held at the historic, and recently renovated, Frederick and Harriet Rauh House in Woodlawn and will feature tours of the home and discussions of preservation efforts of modern architectural gems.

Mill Creek Valley Protection
1:30 am
Fri October 12, 2012

Western Wildlife Corridor

Western Wildlife Corridor

The Western Wildlife Corridor is working hard to improve the Ohio River Valley, specifically on the western side of Hamilton County. Stretching from Mill Creek near downtown to the Great Miami River bordering Indiana, one of the primary threats, according to WWC President Tim Sisson, is the prevalence of invasive plant species. Mark Perzel talks with Mr. Sisson about this and other threats, and how the WWC is working to improve this area of the county.