Powel Crosley Jr.

John Kiesewetter

WLW-AM's iconic diamond-shaped radio tower and historic transmitter building on Tylersville Road soon will be casting their shadows on retail stores, restaurants and offices beneath it.

The "Tower Park" planned unit development along Mason's booming Tylersville Road corridor was approved by city council earlier this year, a city staffer tells me.

John Kiesewetter

Carmon DeLeone and his New Studio Big Band will perform at a Sept. 23 gala celebrating the 75th anniversary of the Voice of America and the 73rd anniversary of the VOA-Bethany Station in West Chester Township.

John Kiesewetter

The National Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting wants a few more antique Crosley products for its fall exhibit on Cincinnati radio pioneer/entrepreneur/inventor Powel Crosley Jr.

Clyde Haehnle collection

Cincinnati’s first radio station celebrates its 94th birthday today in the midst of a fight with the federal government for WLW-AM to keep its nighttime 50,000-watt power reaching 38 states.

On this date in TV Kiese history, March 2, 1922, Cincinnati industrialist Powell Crosley Jr. started what would become known as the “Nation’s Station.” It has operated on 50,000 watts around the clock since 1943, when the government ended its 500,000-watt “super power” experiment.

But some day you no longer will be able to listen to the “Big One” and Reds games on radio while in Florida, New York, Chicago or Atlanta (as I have), if the Federal Communications Commission gets its way.