poverty

The History Of Poverty In Our Region

Jun 11, 2018
cincinnati edition
Provided/NKY Forum

According to U.S. Census data and the Ohio Development Agency’s Ohio Poverty Report, in 2018, nearly 30 percent of Cincinnatians live in poverty. In Northern Kentucky counties, the poverty rate ranges from 9 to 20 percent.

Dozens of local agencies and organizations offer assistance and programs designed to lift people out of poverty, but what has caused the continuing high poverty rate in our region?   

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The Cincinnati chapter of Easterseals is expanding its Prosperity for All program after a two-year pilot showed positive results.

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Life Learning Center in Covington provides an integrated series of learning and care programs to help at-risk individuals in Greater Cincinnati escape poverty and reach their full potential.

NKCAC

According to the U.S. Census Bureau's 2011-2015 American Community Survey, 18.5 percent of people in Kentucky live below the poverty level. One of the challenges to reducing poverty is for communities to provide access to affordable housing.

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When children experience poverty, or live below the poverty threshold, it affects them physically, mentally and emotionally. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2012 American Community Survey, Cincinnati ranked the second highest in the nation with 53.1 percent of children living in poverty. While that percentage has declined in recent years, the rate of child poverty in Cincinnati is still more than 44 percent, which is double the rate of the state and nation.

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Cincinnati ranks among the worst in the nation for child poverty. However, there are many programs in the Greater Cincinnati area that are working to help individuals and families escape poverty. They provide assistance in areas such as family support services, education, employment, health and income.

Trying to put the Department of Job and Family Services out of business - that's how Hamilton County Commissioner Todd Portune describes the goal of the Ohio Healthier Buckeye Council. 

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About a third of Cincinnati residents and almost half of the city’'s children are living in poverty, according to the U.S. Census American Community Survey and WCPO. This number has gone up significantly in the last five years and is double that of national rates.

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The head of one of Cincinnati's largest companies says the region needs a bigger cancer research program.


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  Many individuals and families all across our region are facing hard economic times. According to the latest federal statistics, 18% of the Cincinnati Tri-state population now lives in poverty. And in in a two-square-mile area of Middletown, every single Latino child is poor by federal poverty standards. 

Adjusting curriculum for kids in poverty

Mar 25, 2015
Mark Urycki / StateImpact Ohio

In January, an analysis of federal data found that for the first time in at least 50 years more than half of the public school children in America are living in poverty. In Ohio, the number is only 39 percent, but it still concerns school officials here who know that poor kids come to school carrying extra burdens. In recent years education officials have been looking to brain research for answers.

Downtown Cincinnati Inc. is launching an effort to decrease panhandling while maintaining or increasing support to social services.  DCI president David Ginsburg says the group is publicizing agencies that try to get to the root of poverty.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Volunteers planned to pack a thousand weekend lunch bags for children Monday afternoon at Fountain Square.  The "Power Packs" are sent home with children when they leave school on Friday.

Freestore Foodbank CEO Kurt Reiber says the bags of food are given to children who usually rely on school lunches, so they have enough to eat over the weekend.

Kentucky Housing Corporation

  Scholar House is a housing and education initiative in Kentucky that enables the head-of-household to reach self-sufficiency based on a comprehensive, two-generation approach. The housing and education components are operated as one unit, with housing dependent on a client’'s successful participation in the education component. This model program for breaking the cycle of poverty, already making a difference in five other communities in the state, will soon be available for eligible single parents in Northern Kentucky.