Politics

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is asking his supporters and other Democrats to spend the next several days working to make sure Republican Donald Trump is not the next president.  

The former Democratic candidate is now supporting Hillary Clinton.  

Obviously, the battle for the White House is at the very top of this year's election fight card.

But coming in a not-too-distant second is a battle that has been brewing since the 2014 election, when Republicans took control of the U.S. Senate after eight years of the Democrats being in power.

At the beginning of the year, Democrats could smell victory in the air – all they had to do was to flip four Republicans seats and they could retake control of the Senate.

That's still a possibility in next Tuesday's election, although it's a tough row to hoe for Democrats.

One of the most contentious races in the region is taking place in Covington, where voters in Northern Kentucky's largest city are choosing a mayor.

On one side is the incumbent, Sherry Carran, a former city commissioner who was first elected mayor in 2012; and on the other, Joe Meyer, a former state representative and state senator who headed the state's Education and Workforce Development Cabinet under former governor Steve Beshear.

Political types on both sides agree – the race for Hamilton County commissioner between Republican Dennis Joseph Deters and Democrat Denise Driehaus is the most fiercely contested and most costly race this year for any county office.

And, if the polling that is said to be out there is correct, it may also be the closest contest, the one that keeps everyone up late on election night waiting for an outcome – quite possibly into the wee hours of the morning after.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about how both presidential campaigns - particularly the Hillary Clinton campaign - are focusing their efforts on convincing supporters to vote early. And there was a discussion of how voting percentages drop off dramatically in down-ticket races in presidential years.

Two of the three seats on the Hamilton County Board of Commissioners are up for election this year; and at stake is the balance of power between the majority Republicans and the lone Democrat on the commission.

The race between Democratic state representative Denise Driehaus, who is term-limited out of the legislature, and Republican Dennis Joseph Deters, a former Colerain Township trustee who was appointed commissioner when Greg Hartmann resigned in December, is the one that has drawn most of the money and attention this fall.

Here's something that Hamilton County Democratic Party chairman Tim Burke and his counterpart in the Hamilton County Republican Party, Alex Triantafilou, have in common, nine days before the election.

Neither one of them has even a vague notion of which presidential candidate – Democrat Hillary Clinton or Republican Donald Trump – is going to win Hamilton County, a swing county in a swing state.

Down-ticket races such as county recorder often get lost in the shuffle – especially in a presidential election year.

But the contest for Hamilton County recorder between two-term Democratic incumbent Wayne Coates and Republican Norbert A. Nadel, who was forced to end a nearly 40 year career as a judge in 2014 because of Ohio's age limit law, is drawing more attention than most.

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The presidential campaign and upcoming elections haven’'t been a topic of great interest just  here in the United States. 

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about Donald Trump's claims that the election is "rigged' and how Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted is answering Trump. Also, Wilkinson, a serious baseball fan, says he's rooting for the Cleveland Indians in the World Series. 

It's become clear that most Republican Party leaders at all levels, local and national, are really, really tired of hearing Donald Trump going on about this election being rigged.

This election which, in fact, hasn't happened yet.

A crowd that Donald Trump estimated at 21,000 stomped and hollered and cheered their hero Thursday night as he assailed "crooked Hillary Clinton" over and over again.

"The corruption of the Clintons know no limits,'' Trump said in a 45-minute US Bank Arena speech Thursday night.

"She's highly overrated; she couldn't pass her bar exam in Washington, D.C.,'' Trump said. "Highly overrated person."

Clinton, Trump said, is "a corrupt person….she should be locked up. She should."

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the impact Donald Trump's lewd and vulgar remarks about women in 2005 is already damaging his campaign in Ohio. 

Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

Ohio's junior U.S. senator, Rob Portman announced late Saturday he is rescinding his previous endorsement of Republican president nominee Donald Trump.

Portman was one of dozens of GOP leaders from around the country who have announced they can no longer support Trump, after the disclosure Friday of a 2005 video in which Trump makes lewd, vulgar comments about a married woman he said he wanted to have sex with.

Poor old Ohio. Once the bellwether of the nation; once the ultimate swing state in presidential elections.

Now, if you pay attention to some recent national news reports, Ohio is watching its bellwether status slip away. It is becoming the Rodney Dangerfield of American Politics, shifting its necktie and whining that it gets no respect.

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