political junkie

Pete Rightmire/WVXU


Monday night's match-up between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump was the most-watched presidential debate in history, with more than 84 million viewers. 

WVXU/Pete Rightmire


The first of three presidential candidate debates is just more than three weeks away. 


The conventions in Cleveland and Philadelphia are done, the candidates have hit the campaign trail and the dash to November 8 is fully underway. 

Pete Rightmire/WVXU

Hillary Clinton was in town Sunday for a fundraising dinner, followed Monday by a campaign event with Elizabeth Warren at the Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal. Donald Trump is scheduled to come to Cincinnati next Wednesday for a fundraiser. 

Pete Rightmire/WVXU


Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton won Washington State's primaries Tuesday. It looks all but certain the two will face-off in November. But Bernie Sanders has vowed to stay in the race until the convention.


Soon after Tuesday's Indiana primaries, both Ted Cruz and John Kasich suspended their campaigns, leaving Donald Trump the apparent GOP nominee. And even though Bernie Sanders pulled out a narrow win over Hillary Clinton, it is all but certain she will be the Democratic nominee. So at this point it looks as if the candidates who will run in the general election are two people who, according to recent polls, most Americans just do not like all that much. And members of both parties are left asking, "Now what?" 


We're in the middle of a full week without a primary, but that doesn't mean there has been a lull in the race to the White House. The candidates and their campaigns are keeping things interesting, if not all that presidential.


As the strangest presidential primary race in recent memory continues and we head into Super Tuesday, Political Junkie Ken Rudin and WVXU political reporter Howard Wilkinson join us to discuss the latest news in the Republican and Democratic contests.


After months of campaigning, we are finally just days away from the first vote on the path to the presidency, the Iowa caucuses. Followed just a week later by the New Hampshire primary.


With less than two months left before the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primaries, the Republican presidential candidates met Tuesday night for their last debate of 2015. And the Democrats will hold their last debate of the year this Saturday.

Provided, Ken Rudin

The attacks in Paris last Friday placed national security and the continued threat from the Islamic State and other terrorist groups at the forefront of political discussions this week.

Political outsiders Donald Trump and Ben Carson continue to lead the Republican field of candidates by wide margins, Hillary is polling far ahead of Bernie Sanders, though his numbers actually went up after the first Democratic debate. And now neither has to worry about Vice President Joe Biden jumping into the race.

With two debates under their belts, the remaining Republican presidential contenders continue the fight, though The Donald and Dr. Ben Carson are still leading the polls. 

With the presidential election still almost fifteen months away, many of us are already getting tired of hearing from and about the candidates, and the potential candidates, for president. But with, at last count, 22 declared candidates, the rising popularity of Bernie Sanders, Hillary’'s emails and the Trump, Trump, Trump of The Donald, for those who follow politics for a living, it is truly a wonderful time to be alive.

Last night it was all about the GOP presidential primary, with the seven candidates who didn'’t make the cut for the official debate participating in a separate forum, followed by the ten top-polling candidates taking the stage for the main event, including current front-runner Donald Trump.