Cincinnati is going to spend nearly $2 million to install more parking meters that accept credit cards in addition to coins.  

City Council approved the item Wednesday.

The so called smart meters are already in place in much of downtown.  The additional funding could bring them to more neighborhood locations.

The meter purchases were part of a plan Council approved earlier this year that officially killed a parking lease arrangement the city had negotiated with the Greater Cincinnati Port Authority.

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley is asking council members to sign off on a motion related to the parking lease with the Greater Cincinnati Port Authority. The measure is currently circulating among council members. It would make major changes to the original plan between the city and the port.

Cranley could publicly release details of the plan Wednesday.

Phillips Edison

The former troubled Kenwood Towne Place, now known as Kenwood Collection will open in the spring of 2015. As it takes shape, Sycamore Township is being proactive to prevent traffic problems.

You don't have to remind Township Board President Tom Weidman how backed up traffic can get in Kenwood around the holidays. He says, "From the first day after Thanksgiving to sometime in January we all have to coexist down there."

The residents who opposed Cincinnati's controversial parking lease are asking the Ohio Supreme Court to hear the case.  

Attorneys filed a notice of appeal Monday and a motion asking for an expedited schedule for the matter.  

In June, the Ohio First District Court of Appeals ruled in favor of Cincinnati on the proposed parking lease to the Port Authority.  In a two-to-one opinion the panel said the lease agreement Council passed in March is not subject to a voter referendum, because it was passed as an emergency ordinance.  

Update 6/17/13 9:50 PM:  Hamilton County Judge Robert Winkler signed an order Monday dissolving permanent injunction in the Cincinnati parking lease case.  Judge Winkler also entered a judgment in favor of the city and against the plaintiffs.  Costs to be paid by plaintiffs. With permanent injunction dissolved, city officials should have "green light" to sign the parking lease agreement with the Port Authority.

Cincinnati lawyers are making two major arguments as the city appeal’s a judge’s decision that let opponents of the parking lease place the issue on the November ballot.  

In a brief filed Friday with the Ohio First District Court of Appeals city lawyers argued the trial court erred by declaring that all city ordinances are subject to referendum and that the plaintiffs have standing to bring their claims. 

Not surprisingly the attorneys who successfully challenged the Cincinnati parking lease in court are opposed to the city's request for a judge to stay his decision from last month.  

Lawyers Curt Hartman and Chris Finney filed a response in Hamilton County Common Pleas Court Thursday.  

A Hamilton County judge is extending a temporary restraining order (TRO) preventing Cincinnati officials from signing a proposal to lease most of the city's parking facilities to the Port Authority.  

Judge Robert Winkler issued the order Wednesday extending the TRO until April 3.  

Update:  It appears likely five Cincinnati Council members are ready to support the city manager's plan to lease most of the city's parking facilities to the Greater Cincinnati Port Authority and four private companies.  

The Budget and Finance Committee could vote on the issue Monday.  

Council Member Wendell Young confirmed Friday he plans to vote yes and four other members have generally expressed support during recent hearings.

Sarah Ramsey

Two dozen people spoke at a public hearing Monday night on a proposal to lease some of Cincinnati's parking facilities to a private operator.  And all but a couple of them were opposed to the plan. 

Chad Weldishofer owns Queen City Crossfit in Downtown.  He's concerned about the possibility of high rates at parking meters near his business.