OTR Parking

Cincinnati Council has decided the city should collect about $28.988 million in property tax revenue in 2017.  

City Council approved a tentative tax budget Wednesday asking for that amount of revenue.

Bill Rinehart

The full Cincinnati Council could vote Wednesday on a plan to establish a residential parking permit program in parts of Over-the-Rhine.  The Neighborhoods Committee approved the proposal Monday.  

Mayor John Cranley vetoed a similar plan last year.  But now it supposedly has the support of six council members, which is enough to override a veto.  

Bill Rinehart

A plan to bring residential parking permits to Cincinnati’s Over-the-Rhine neighborhood appears to have new life.

Vice Mayor David Mann said Tuesday he is reintroducing the proposal and now has the support of Council Member Charlie Winburn.  That means there are six council members willing to vote for it, which makes it veto-proof.

Bill Rinehart

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley's veto of the Over-the-Rhine residential parking permit program will stand.  

City Council did not have the six votes needed Wednesday to override it, and it was Council's last opportunity to act.  

Sarah Ramsey

A Cincinnati Council committee will have two proposals to consider for bringing residential parking permits to portions of Over-the-Rhine.  

City administrators had a plan ready to be implemented.  But Council rejected it last month and the rules say it cannot come back without being changed.  

Mayor John Cranley has an OTR parking proposal without a specific fee for the permits.

It is back to the drawing board for a proposal to bring residential parking permits to parts of Over-the-Rhine.  Council rejected the ordinance Wednesday.  

Four members voted yes, and three voted no.  It takes five "yes's" to approve such a measure, and two members were absent.

The full Cincinnati Council will likely vote Wednesday to let a residential parking permit program move forward in parts of Over-the-Rhine.  The Neighborhoods Committee approved the proposal Monday.

Transportation and Engineering Director Michael Moore described how it will be implemented.

A Cincinnati Council committee could vote in two weeks on a plan to set up a residential parking permit program in parts of the Over-the-Rhine.  

Legislation to enact the proposal could be ready by the end of this week for the Neighborhoods Committee to consider.  

The area for the program would be bounded by Central Parkway on the west and south; Sycamore on the east and Liberty on the north.  

Transportation and Engineering Director Michael Moore said some residents want to know why it does not go north of Liberty.

Cincinnati officials are continuing work on a plan to bring residential parking permits to the city's Over-the-Rhine neighborhood.  

Council's Neighborhoods Committee heard Tuesday about the latest proposal.  

One change is the price.  The original plan called for the permits to cost $300 a year.  That has now been reduced to $108 annually.  There would also be a lower rate of $18 a year for people in rent subsidized housing.  

Mary Rivers with Over-the-Rhine Community Housing says she's still concerned with that part.

Cincinnati officials are still working to fine tune a proposal that could make changes to how residents and patrons park in the city's Over-the-Rhine neighborhood.  

For residents it could mean buying a residential parking permit and right now that has a proposed fee of $300 a year.  

Resident Julie Faye spoke about the plan Monday a Council committee meeting.

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