Activists offer stats and stories of effect of Ohio abortion laws

Mar 11, 2015

During the past four years, Ohio lawmakers have passed several laws restricting abortion in Ohio. But the questions about the effect those laws are having on women in the Buckeye State depends on who you ask.

If you talk to opponents of Ohio’s new restrictions on abortion, they’ll tell you those laws are forcing Ohio’s women into going out of state for abortions and care for difficult pregnancies.

It is not hard to understand why most folks in these parts might have been distracted this week from following the daily comings and goings of the nascent campaign for Ohio’s U.S. Senate seat.

The election which, for the record, is still a little over 20 months away.

First there was the distraction of the record-breaking cold and its running mate, record-breaking snow.

The group that’s behind a proposed marijuana legalization amendment has released more details about its plan; and it includes growing facilities in Hamilton, Clermont and Butler counties.

The proposed constitutional amendment would legalize marijuana for recreational use by adults 21 and over and for medical use with permission of a doctor.

Backers of the plan wold have to gather the valid signatures of about 306,000 Ohio voters by the beginning of July to place the issue on the November ballot.

Holly Yurchison / WVXU

A new independent poll shows that, among Ohio voters, Hillary Clinton would easily defeat some of the best-known potential Republican presidential contenders – except for Ohio Gov. John Kasich.

The Quinnipiac University poll showed a virtual dead heat between the Democratic front-runner and Kasich among registered Ohio voters – 44 percent for Clinton and 43 percent for Kasich.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about Cincinnati council member P.G. Sittenfeld's bid for the Democratic U.S. Senate nomination in 2016. Does Sittenfeld have a chance win the nomination and unseat GOP incumbent Rob Portman?

To almost no one’s surprise, Cincinnati council member P.G. Sittenfeld announced this week that he is running for the Democratic U.S. Senate nomination, with the hopes of knocking off incumbent Republican Rob Portman in November 2016.

Sittenfeld is an ambitious young man; and, especially in politics, there is nothing wrong with that. He had been dropping hints that he was considering jumping into the Senate race for weeks; and people on both sides of the aisle were taking him seriously.

Spot checks discover students missing from some Ohio charter schools

Jan 23, 2015
Andy Chow/Ohio Public Radio

Investigators in Ohio Auditor Dave Yost’s office swept through 30 charter schools and found a big difference between the number of students officials reported to the Ohio Department of Education and the actual headcount in half of those schools.

“I frankly was shocked to find that 50% seems to be the average,’’ Yost said. “I think most of the folks in the legislature if you asked them without any backing they would be surprised by 50% attendance rate.”  

A national group that pushes for more traffic safety laws says Ohio is among 31 states getting a “caution” or “yellow” rating in its latest annual report.

But Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety says Ohio has only passed seven of 15 laws it considers necessary. President Jackie Gillan said Ohio needs a primary seat belt law and a law requiring helmets for all motorcycle riders, among others.

Nick Castele

CLEVELAND - A state task force on police-community relations held its first meeting here Tuesday night and heard from about 20 citizens on their treatment by police.

Some speakers recommended collecting data on racial profiling in Ohio, training officers to respond to people with mental illness, and setting up an independent panel to review police shootings. Many speakers urged the task force to consider race in its final proposals.

The task force is slated to deliver a report to Gov. John Kasich by the end of April.

Don’t be jealous, Cincinnati, but our neighbor to the north, Columbus, may be on the verge of landing its first presidential nominating convention

And, if the Democratic National Committee decides to land its 2016 convention in Ohio’s capital city, it will mean the Buckeye State will be hosting both major party presidential nominating conventions next year. The Republicans have already chosen Cleveland, after passing over Cincinnati and a number of other cities.