Ohio Supreme Court

The Ohio Republican Party has endorsed two Hamilton County judges – Patrick DeWine and Patrick Fischer – for two seats on the Ohio Supreme Court that will be open next year.

Fischer and DeWine  - both members of the Ohio 1st District Court of Appeals - will be running for the seats of incumbent Republicans Judith Ann Lanzinger and Paul Pfeifer, who can’t run for re-election because of Ohio’s judicial age limit law.

The Ohio Republican Party has also endorsed the court’s chief justice, Maureen O’Connor, for re-election.

The Ohio Supreme Court decision that nearly a hundred million dollars in equipment bought by charter school operators with tax money belongs to those operators and not to the schools has raised more anger against the industry.

The Ohio Supreme Court has sided with a controversial charter school operator in a very narrow decision.

The case involved 10 Cleveland-area charter schools that contracted with White Hat Management to operate them.

Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Six of the nine Ohioans who were exonerated after being sentenced to death want state lawmakers to consider changes to capital punishment in Ohio.

Joe D’Ambrosio spent 22 years on death row for a Cleveland murder he didn’t commit.

“If it can happen to me, it can happen to you, or your children, or your grandchildren,” D’Ambrosio said.

He and five other exonerated former death row inmates want state lawmakers to seriously consider the 57 recommendations made by an Ohio Supreme Court task force on capital punishment last year.

  A professor from University of Cincinnati Blue Ash took an appeal in a murder trial all the way to Ohio Supreme Court, and won. Wendy Calaway is a practicing attorney and a professor in the Behavioral Science Department at UC Blue Ash, where she teaches criminal justice, criminology and corrections courses.

Hamilton County Juvenile Court

Suspended juvenile court judge Tracie Hunter will not have to report to jail Monday morning,  thanks to a ruling late Friday afternoon by the Ohio Supreme Court.

The court, on a 4-3, said Hunter could remain free on her own recognizance while her felony conviction on a felony count of unlawful interest in a public contract is under appeal.

2014 brought several big cases to the Republican-dominated Ohio Supreme Court, which delivered opinions that surprised some observers.

The Ohio Supreme Court ended the year by deciding one of the highest-profile cases of the year – ruling 4-3 that traffic camera programs are constitutional, and specifically that Toledo can allow appeals to go through an administrative hearing process and not municipal court. But Republican Sen. Bill Seitz of Cincinnati, the sponsor of a bill to regulate traffic cameras, says the ruling is basically moot.

Hunter suspended from practicing law

Oct 21, 2014
Ann Thompson / WVXU

Tracie Hunter has been suspended from practicing law in Ohio, following her conviction earlier this month.

The Ohio Supreme Court will hear a big case on the red light and speed cameras that some 15 Ohio communities are using.

The issue is not whether setting up cameras to catch red light runners and speeders is legal. It’s about whether requiring appeals of traffic camera citations to be heard by administrative hearing officers instead of in municipal court is legal. That is how most cities across the country deal with appeals of traffic camera tickets.

Ohio Supreme Court issues long awaited ruling in JobsOhio case

Jun 10, 2014

The state’s highest court has ruled that ProgressOhio, a liberal policy group, and two Democratic lawmakers, do not have the right to sue over the constitutionality of JobsOhio.

"It's been a long, strange trip," said ProgressOhio’s Brian Rothenberg, who had sued on behalf of taxpayers.

The case has been tied up in court for more than a year. The ruling means the Ohio Supreme Court will not decide the issue of whether the legislature’s creation of JobsOhio was constitutional.