Ohio Supreme Court

Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Six of the nine Ohioans who were exonerated after being sentenced to death want state lawmakers to consider changes to capital punishment in Ohio.

Joe D’Ambrosio spent 22 years on death row for a Cleveland murder he didn’t commit.

“If it can happen to me, it can happen to you, or your children, or your grandchildren,” D’Ambrosio said.

He and five other exonerated former death row inmates want state lawmakers to seriously consider the 57 recommendations made by an Ohio Supreme Court task force on capital punishment last year.

  A professor from University of Cincinnati Blue Ash took an appeal in a murder trial all the way to Ohio Supreme Court, and won. Wendy Calaway is a practicing attorney and a professor in the Behavioral Science Department at UC Blue Ash, where she teaches criminal justice, criminology and corrections courses.

Hamilton County Juvenile Court

Suspended juvenile court judge Tracie Hunter will not have to report to jail Monday morning,  thanks to a ruling late Friday afternoon by the Ohio Supreme Court.

The court, on a 4-3, said Hunter could remain free on her own recognizance while her felony conviction on a felony count of unlawful interest in a public contract is under appeal.

2014 brought several big cases to the Republican-dominated Ohio Supreme Court, which delivered opinions that surprised some observers.

The Ohio Supreme Court ended the year by deciding one of the highest-profile cases of the year – ruling 4-3 that traffic camera programs are constitutional, and specifically that Toledo can allow appeals to go through an administrative hearing process and not municipal court. But Republican Sen. Bill Seitz of Cincinnati, the sponsor of a bill to regulate traffic cameras, says the ruling is basically moot.

Hunter suspended from practicing law

Oct 21, 2014
Ann Thompson / WVXU

Tracie Hunter has been suspended from practicing law in Ohio, following her conviction earlier this month.

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