Ohio River

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Seasonal flooding comes as no surprise to Tristate officials, who have ordered a handful of road closures, and are preparing to close more as the Ohio River rises.  And the flooding has shined a spotlight on the relative isolation of a pair of Hamilton County communities.

River levels around Hamilton County are already high, and with more rain today and tomorrow, the sheriff's office and county engineer are preparing to close more roads.  Parts of Four Mile, Eight Mile, Debolt and Kellogg had water standing on them earlier this week.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

**Updated March 9**

The Ohio River crested at 53 feet, Sunday, according to the Associated Press.  That's one foot above flood stage.  The river level is expected to fall slowly through the rest of the week.  The National Weather Service is predicting rain on Tuesday, and again Thursday and Friday.

**Original story** 

With plenty of rain and snow this week, area rivers are expected to rise quickly.

Storm Water Management Utility City of Cincinnati

City of Cincinnati workers spent Tuesday clearing storm water pipes and manholes of leaves, debris and trash. With lots of melting snow, rain and more snow in the forecast, they're worried about flooding.

Principle engineer of the Storm Water Management Utility, Eric Saylor, put it in perspective. "If we did nothing, basically you'd have overland street flooding. With colder temperatures you would have "ponding" around some of the inlets which could, of course, lead to icing, so it becomes a safety hazard as well."

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

The U. S. Coast Guard says there are big chunks of ice  hovering along the banks of the Ohio River but the agency does not expect the river to freeze and disrupt any traffic in the next few days.

What does concern Chief Warrant Officer Mark Nemec is the additional snowfall and warm-up this weekend. He says, "I was looking at the river stages that are reported from NOAA and it looks like we will see an increase, starting this weekend, and going into next week where the levels will rise."

Sarah Ramsey

Update 2/19/15: In a news release the Greater Cincinnati Water Works (GCWW) reports response teams on site at the West Virginia train derailment have found little, if any, oil in the Kanawha River, an Ohio River tributary.

The GCWW says, "Water samples have been collected hourly from the river. No oil has been detected in the samples."

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Update at 7:20 AM: Cincinnati's water intakes on the Ohio River are re-opened this morning following a diesel fuel spill yesterday at a Duke Energy Power Plant in New Richmond.  Water officials say the spill has passed through the Cincinnati area.

Holly Yurchison / WVXU

Plenty of people will be making waves in and around the Ohio River this weekend, whether it be in a clean-up capacity or participation in America's largest paddle event.

Ohio River Sweep

The Port Authority of Greater Cincinnati is continuing its efforts to expand its statistical boundaries in order to make the region a bigger player in freight commerce.

Brown, Adams, Scioto and Boone counties are already on board with the plan and Hamilton County gave its approval last week.

In October 2011, Kyle Rouse and three friends set off on a Mark Twain-esque adventure: a pontoon boat ride from Cincinnati to New Orleans via the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. He’s published a book about this journey, Cincinnati to New Orleans, and he’s with Lee Hay to discuss the inspiration for the trip and his use of a good old-fashioned film camera to capture the images in the book.

Sarah Ramsey

Enforcement of new mercury standards for industrial and wastewater treatment plants along the Ohio River may be delayed and that has environmental groups concerned.

Documents show there are dozens of companies and municipalities with mercury monitoring requirements that dump into the Ohio River.

Mercury levels based on Great Lakes

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