Ohio Republican Party

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the four likely Republican candidates for Ohio governor and the impact that President Trump could have on the race. 

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the 2018 statewide elections in Ohio; and whether or not Ohio Democrats can stop the Republicans' march toward making Ohio a totally red state. 

"Leans Republican."

That's the category where Ohio's already-churning 2018 gubernatorial race  is placed by Sabato's Crystal Ball, a highly-respected weekly politics newsletter published by director Larry J. Sabato of the University of Virginia's Center for Politics.

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the growing number of Democratic candidates for Ohio governor; and how both the Republicans and Democrats are likely to have lively primary battles for governor in 2018 

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about why, in early 2017, the 2018 Ohio governor's race appears to be ramping up. The main reason: It's an open seat: incumbent John Kasich can't run again. 

The Ohio Republican Party, which has done quite well in statewide elections over the past decade or so, has a nice, neat little bunch of politicians just itching to run for governor next year.

Four of them. Attorney General Mike DeWine. Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted. U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci of Wadsworth, in Medina County and Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor, who filed paperwork with Husted's office on Thursday so she can start campaigning and, most importantly, raising money.

Red, blue or purple.

Those are the three choices on the political spectrum for a city, a county, or a state.

Ohio voters will pick their favorite color in 2018, the next round of statewide elections, in every office from governor and U.S. senator on down.

And how they choose might determine whether the pendulum swings back from red to blue, or at least, purple, in a state where all the statewide constitutional officeholders are Republican and where Donald Trump stunned Ohio Democrats in November by winning Ohio's 18 electoral votes by a sizeable margin.

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday about Friday's election of Trump supporter Jane Timken as Ohio Republican Party chair over incumbent Matt Borges, an ally of Gov. John Kasich. It was a clear victory for Trump in his long-standing feud with the Ohio governor, who never endorsed Trump after he was nominated at the GOP convention in Cleveland. 

Ordinarily, if a presidential candidate were to win the battleground state of Ohio by a fairly sizeable margin of 446,841 votes out of slightly more than 7.8 million cast, you might think that candidate and his political party in Ohio would be on very good terms.

That margin of victory for Donald Trump is the largest for a GOP presidential candidate in Ohio since George H.W. Bush in 1988.

Ohio Republicans should be dancing in the streets.

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the funeral plans for former astronaut and U.S. Senator John H. Glenn Jr., who died last week  at the age of 95. And Wilkinson also talked about the brewing battle for control of the Ohio Republican Party between the forces loyal to Ohio Gov. John Kasich and supporters of president-elect Donald Trump. 

WVXU-FM

The last three election cycles have been miserable for Democrats in Ohio. Hillary Clinton failed to win the state this year, and, in 2014 and 2010, the Democrats were completely shut of all of Ohio's statewide constitutional offices. Can they make a comeback in 2018's mid-term election? WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Jay Hanselman about it on Morning Edition Monday. 

By the time you read this, I will be in Cleveland, about to cover my 15th presidential nominating convention, Democratic and Republican, over the past four decades.

This one promises to be an event unlike anything any of us have ever seen.

A bombastic developer of high-rise towers and casinos who has gone through cycles of boom-and-bust over and over again throughout his career, a man whose celebrity grew as the host of a reality TV show, suddenly decides last year to run for the Republican nomination for president.

  Stop the presses! Rip up the front page! News flash!

The Ohio Republican Party’s central committee endorsed Ohio Gov. John Kasich in the March 15 GOP presidential primary Friday on a 44-9 vote.

What? You are not stunned by this news?

That’s OK. No one else was either.

Some Republicans around the state were grumbling about it, believing that the state party has no business butting into a presidential primary campaign.

Next year's Ohio presidential primary may be pushed back a week to March 15, a move that could give the Ohio Republican delegation more clout at the GOP convention in Cleveland in July.

State Representative Mike Dovilla of Berea, the House majority whip, introduced a bill Monday in the Ohio House to set March 15 as Ohio's presidential primary date. It is currently scheduled for March 8.

Facebook page

If there was one word to describe Ohio Party Chairman Chris Redfern on Election night, it would be “angry.”

Redfern lambasted Statehouse reporters and the newspapers that employ them for pulling web versions of stories and videos that were not flattering to Republicans. And he lashed out for what he saw as a media obsession on the bombshell revelation that came out around Labor Day that Democratic Gubernatorial candidate Ed FitzGerald had been driving for most of a decade without a valid driver’s license.

Pages