Ohio Public Radio

Michael E. Keating/WVXU

Each Friday on Cincinnati Edition we present an in-depth look at the developments behind the headlines. 

Michael E. Keating/WVXU

Each Friday on Cincinnati Edition, we present an in-depth look at the developments behind the headlines.

Michael E. Keating

Ohio Governor John Kasich took time away from the presidential campaign trail Wednesday night to deliver his State of the State address. Cincinnati leaders are developing rules covering public access to police body cam footage. Kentucky legislators are looking for a way to resolve the commonwealth's pension problems, and the battle against the heroin epidemic continues on both sides of the river.

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Political pundits were calling it Super Tuesday II. Yesterday, voters in five states – including Ohio – chose the candidate they want representing their party in the November presidential election. Ohio Governor John Kasich won his home state’s primary, picking up his first victory and all 66 Ohio delegates. And increasing the chances of a contested convention in Cleveland this July. Hillary Clinton won the Democratic primary in Ohio.

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One of the most important factors in any election is how the voters feel, about the direction of the country, their personal situations, and what the future may hold for them and their families. And this year voters are nervous, angry and frustrated.

When leaders talk about reforming criminal sentencing, some begin to argue that it’s too easy for average Ohioans to break the laws. Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow has more on the topic of what’s been called “overcriminalization”.

  With the mid-term elections behind us, national political attention is now turned to the presidential election in 2016. But what takes place on the state and local level over the next year arguably has more of an affect on the day to day lives of people and businesses.

Ohio's jobless rate goes up

Aug 15, 2014

For the first time in nine months, Ohio’s unemployment rate went up last month.   The news has the political spin machines working on high speed.

Ohio’s jobless rate was 5.7 in July, up from 5.5 in June. Ben Johnson with the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services says that’s not reason to think that means the state’s economy is failing:

“We don’t think that the overall trend has changed. We believe that the economy is slowly improving and will continue to slowly improve.

  The debate over charter schools in Ohio has heated up, and several schools and the organizations that run them are currently under investigation. Proponents of charter schools point to them as an option for parents seeking schools that best suit their children. Critics say the schools siphon funding from local public school districts and that many produce poorer academic results than traditional public schools.

Provided, State of Ohio, Governor's Office

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