Ohio News

The group pushing for payday lending reform is taking their fight outside of the Statehouse and to Ohio voters. Advocates hope to put an issue on the ballot that caps interest rates.

An environmental group and an oil and gas industry lobbying group are both praising a bill that passed the House that would streamline the process of capping some 600 old, unused wells that don’t have owners. And they also want more money put toward that process.

There are more allegations of inappropriate sexual comments by state lawmakers-  this time at a party about a block away from the Statehouse. 

Sponsors of a bipartisan bill in the state Legislature say they have a plan to lower the price of prescription drugs. But it doesn’t do it the same way as the issue Ohio voters rejected in November – it’s aimed at the middlemen in the insurance process, pharmacy benefit managers.

A convicted killer is claiming that since the US Supreme Court struck down Florida’s capital punishment sentencing law in 2016, Ohio’s death penalty law is now unconstitutional. He’s claiming the ruling that a jury must sentence a defendant to death makes Ohio’s two-part sentencing process illegal.

Two of the more conservative Republican lawmakers at the Statehouse want to put six different issues before voters that would make Ohio a so-called “right to work” state and eliminate prevailing wage. 

History suggests that the party not represented in the White House does well in midterm Congressional elections – and this year Ohio’s five executive offices, including governor, are also on the ballot, along with US Senate. And national experts will be watching.

Supporters of the now closed Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow say the past few days have been devastating for students, families, and teachers. The online charter school closed because its sponsor voted to drop them. But there are school and state officials who are holding out hope.

Supporters of a redistricting plan that might be on the November ballot are critical of a bill being considered by Ohio lawmakers that would let them retain control over the process of drawing Congressional district lines. 

Thousands of students are either starting in a new school or still looking for a place to take classes after the closure of the state’s largest online charter school. The Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow is still fighting the state’s claw back of $60 million and blames the state Department of Education for its fate. But one vocal critic says ECOT only has itself to blame.

The budget passed last year requires the state to apply for permission to impose work requirements on able-bodied Medicaid recipients. That could mean thousands of Ohioans could lose their health care coverage. While some support the idea, it's controversial to others.

An estimated 12,000 students must figure out where to go now that the state’s largest online charter school has closed. Marred by budget problems and alleged failure to comply with regulations, ECOT’s sponsor decided to back out. And the sponsor and the school met in a Franklin County courtroom to figure out what happens to the school’s funds and records. 

Amazon has narrowed down its list of possible sites for its second headquarters and Columbus is one of 20 cities nationwide that made the cut. Gov. John Kasich credits JobsOhio for helping make the city attractive to the internet retailer.

National stats estimate 1 in 25 people is threatened or harassed by the sharing of explicit images of themselves online without their consent or knowledge. And right now, it’s not illegal in Ohio to do that. But there’s a new bill that hopes to ban so-called “revenge porn”.

The only Democrat on the Ohio Supreme Court is speaking out after the Republican-dominated Senate voted yesterday to take the first step to remove him from the bench.

Clean energy issues have been a sparkplug for debate at the Statehouse for years now, with opposition mostly coming from Republicans and Democrats supporting incentives for the industry. A clean energy group has new data that they say can change the debate during campaign season.

State stats show overdoses from opioids – including heroin and fentanyl – are killing at least nine people a day. And that figure is likely to rise by the time new numbers are released this summer. The crisis brought advocates to Columbus for a daylong conference on how local groups and communities can fight it.

A bill designed to help protect victims of dating violence that lawmakers said was a high priority is on its way to the Senate. 

A program that helps working families in Ohio afford health care for their children with serious medical conditions is in limbo right now. 

Drug addiction councilors are speaking out against a bill that would send an ex-convict to jail if they fail a drug test. They say this proposal uses the judicial system to solve a health care crisis. 

The annual statewide Martin Luther King Jr. oratory contest brought out some strong words from its student winners.

The state has honored seven people for carrying on the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

This week has been one long series of candidate shuffling as different Democratic and Republican contenders for governor have either joined forces with other candidates or moved to another race. One candidate has now dropped out completely.

A state lawmaker is introducing a bill that would require drug companies to slash their prices. The legislation is similar to the measure voters overwhelmingly voted down on last year’s ballot. The senator says there are some key differences that might help its chances, though Democrats are deep in the minority.

Many schools throughout the state are closing early because the ice and snow is expected later this afternoon. Ohio Department of Transportation crews are preparing for it.

The Trump Administration is clearing the way for states to attach work requirements for Medicaid. The announcement has sparked outrage among health care advocates. This can mean some changes for the state’s program.

The state’s largest online charter school could be in danger of closing in the near future with the news that the school is losing its sponsor. This is just the latest domino to fall for the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, which has been battling financial and regulatory issues for years now. 

When Treasurer Josh Mandel dropped out of the U.S. Senate race last week, questions were raised about whether one of the Republicans in the crowded field for governor would step up to run in that contest. Now that's happened.

Two big announcements in the governor's race - the Democratic field narrowed as two candidates teamed up, and the Republican field is full with the announcement from the only candidate who hadn't named her running mate.

Lawmakers are off and running on the contentious issue of changing the way the map of Ohio’s Congressional districts is drawn. Reforming that process is meant to stop the practice of gerrymandering, when the lines benefit one party over another. But the outline of a new proposal has caused a rift between several groups.

Pages