Ohio News

A bill to overhaul the payday lending industry in Ohio is heading back to the House after the Senate approved the legislation with some changes. Consumer advocates are touting this as sensible reform while lenders argue this will put them out of business. 

More than 100 people are believed to still be detained after immigration raids in Northern Ohio last month that garnered international attention.

Sunday the Bishop of the Diocese of Cleveland Nelson Perez celebrated Mass in Lorain for the needs of immigrant families, and for immigration reform.

Federal law requires students with disabilities to spend as much time as possible in general education classrooms, but a study from Ohio State University has found that’s not happening in Ohio, or the rest of the country.

A vehicle testing facility that’s three times as big as Disneyland is now under construction about an hour northwest of Columbus. 

The Ohio Senate is introducing changes to a payday lending crackdown that passed the House by a big margin. Supporters of the legislation say it will help shutdown predatory lending and a cycle of debt. 

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted is taking extra steps to clarify the state's process for clearing voter rolls, outlining some new initiatives aimed at helping voters stay up-to-date.

A national group that advocates for so-called “right to work” policies is threatening to sue Ohio if it doesn’t stop collecting dues from state workers who are not union members, following last month’s US Supreme Court decision on the issue. But the state’s largest public employee union says the threat is unnecessary – and went to the wrong agency anyway.

One of the leading figures in the state’s battle against the deadly opioid crisis is stepping down. The head of the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, who’s leaving six months before the end of the term of her boss, Gov. John Kasich.

Parents of children in daycares throughout Ohio sometimes don’t know when those facilities have been found by the state to have engaged in unsafe behavior. But a bill that’s working its way through the state legislature is designed to change that. 

The two people running for governor are laying out their plans for how to help children succeed. Both Mike DeWine and Rich Cordray say it all begins before the kids are even born. Cordray sees one clear difference between his take and that of his opponent.

A group that wants a constitutional amendment to change some regulatons on how Ohio kidney dialysis patients receive treatment submitted signatures to be on the fall ballot yesterday. But the proposal is already facing opposition.

After failing to qualify candidates for the statewide ballot for the last two election cycles, libertarians are fighting to regain their party status in Ohio. The group has filed more than 100,000 signatures to put that party designation back on the ballot.

Democrats have been blasting Republican Attorney General and candidate for governor Mike DeWine for not doing more about the multi-million dollar scandal involving the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, the now-closed online charter school. But Republicans are pushing back.

Protests against current immigration policies continue around the Statehouse. While the state doesn’t dictate that policy, activists say it has a lot to lose from it. 

It was a busy holiday for groups that want voters to approve two new constitutional amendments this fall. Both proposals got thousands of petition signatures, but they also both have their critics.

The Ohio Attorney General has filed an argument in court claiming ECOT’s agreements with its management and software service companies constitute a pattern of corrupt activity. The claim echoes complaints Democratic lawmakers have lodged for years. 

New regulations on so-called puppy mills will take effect in a few weeks, with Gov. John Kasich signing a bill into law on Friday. And that has animal rights activists who had been wanting to put a puppy mill crackdown before voters calling off their campaign.

While many Ohioans are enjoying picnics, parades and fireworks, members of a group that wants to put a proposed ballot issue before voters this fall are working to meet the July 4deadline. 

A Republican state representative has been tapped to fill a judicial seat in Montgomery County. 

This Independence Day, many fireworks retailers in Ohio have abandoned the form that buyers had been required to sign saying they’d take their purchases out of state to set them off. But the sponsor of a bipartisan fireworks bill hopes for a lot of changes by next year.

Ohioans are now navigating a new process to get their driver’s licenses. It’s mostly the same, but with a big difference.

Two Democratic women state representatives have asked Attorney General and Republican candidate for governor Mike DeWine to reopen an investigation into comments made by the Majority Floor Leader at a going-away party in January. They say they’re concerned not only about the alleged conduct of Rep. Bill Seitz (R-Cincinnati), but with a previous investigation that cleared him of wrongdoing.

On Sunday – the start of the state’s new fiscal year – the most complicated change the behavioral health system in Ohio has ever undergone officially kicks in. And some providers of addiction and mental illness treatment and counseling for low-income Ohioans are worried they won’t survive being moved into the Medicaid managed care system.

For the first time, a company has been given the go-ahead to start growing marijuana in Ohio. The group just received an official cultivator license from the state. Now more than a dozen other companies are lined up for inspections. The state’s medical marijuana program is still behind schedule.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruling on union laws caused a national stir and sent a shock wave to labor groups in Ohio. Some Republican lawmakers have been trying to pass bills around unions and collective bargaining for years. According to the top Senate leader, now they no longer have to, in regards to the public sector.

Gov. John Kasich has signed a bill that would continue $2.5 million in funding for a 40-year-old program providing wraparound services for at-risk kids with severe behavioral needs in Cuyahoga County. The program’s operator had said it was concerned that services would have to stop because of a dispute over who should pay for them.

The Republican candidate for governor has released what he says is a plan to invest in Ohio’s kids, families and future. But Democrats are saying his record shows he can’t be trusted on this.

The House and Senate sent two bills to the governor that attempt to clean up funding for the state’s online charter school system. Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle believe this is an important step toward more transparency and accountability. 

The Veterans Memorial and Museum has been in development in downtown Columbus since 2015, but last week it added an adjective: It's now the National Veterans Memorial and Museum.

The bill to clampdown on payday lending interest rates and fees has hit another wall. After passing out of the House with strong support, Senate Republicans have halted the bill in committee in order to consider possible changes. 

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